Computer Aided Manufacturing

students as entry-level machinists in many areas, including aerospace, computer industries, job shop, gun smithing, tool and die making, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) operator, and CNC programmer. Students will study machining processes and procedures using lathes, mills, drill presses, cylindrical grinders, and surface grinders.

The first year students will use a variety of manual machines, including engine lathes, horizontal and vertical mills, cylindrical grinders, surface grinders, drill presses, and radial arm drill. Students will work from blueprints and follow exact specifications and apply practical shop math to accomplish the required tasks. Much of the lab time will be used for shop and project work.

The second-year CNC portion of machine shop is devoted to the programming and operation of the CNC machine. Students will be prepared to enter the work force as entry level programmers and CAD/CAM technicians. Students will program and operate machining centers and turning centers in the lab. Students will learn the Mastercam programming system, which allows students to design parts on the computer and then manufacture them in the lab. Students will work from blueprints and exact specifications that are used in industry. Lab work will include manual and CNC machine use. These machines will be used for manufacturing fixtures, project work, and production projects.

Gainful Employment

Computer Aided Manufacturing
Associate of Applied Science

Career Outlook: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics employment of metal and plastic machine workers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Employment will be affected by advances in technology, changing demand for the goods these workers produce, foreign competition, and the reorganization of production processes.

One of the most important factors influencing employment growth in these occupations is the use of labor-saving machinery. Many firms are adopting new technologies, such as computer-controlled machine tools and robots, to improve quality, lower production costs, and remain competitive. The switch to computer-controlled machinery requires computer programmers instead of machine setters, operators, and tenders. The lower-skilled manual machine tool operator and tender jobs are more likely to be eliminated by these new technologies because the computer-controlled machinery does the work more effectively.

The demand for metal and plastic machine workers also is affected by the demand for the parts they produce. Both the plastic and metal manufacturing industries face stiff foreign competition that is limiting the orders for parts produced in this country. Some U.S. manufacturers have recently sent their production to foreign countries, limiting jobs for machine setters and operators.

Despite slower than average employment growth, a number of these jobs are expected to become available for highly skilled workers because of an expected increase in retirements, primarily of baby boomers, in the coming years.

In addition, workers who have a thorough background in machine operations, certifications from industry associations, and a good working knowledge of the properties of metals and plastics should have the best job opportunities.


Employment Opportunities with SOC Code:
CNC Machine Tool Operator 51-4012.00
CCM Tool Operators 51-4011.00
First-Line Production Supervisor 51-1011.00
Prepress Technicians and Workers 51-5111.00

Salary Forecast: MT CO
CNC Mach Tool Operator 51-4012.00 39,400 37,590
CCM Tool Operators 51-4011.00 28,080 37,900
First-Line Prod Spv 51-1011.00 52,530 61,610
Prepress Techs & Workers 51-5111.00 28,400 36,910

For the most current salary information please refer to the Bureau of Labor Statistics “Occupational Outlook Handbook found at www.bls.gov/ooh/.


Program Cost: Approximately $9,200





Computer Aided Manufacturing



Length of Program: 4 Semesters
Type of Program: Associate of Applied Science
Semester of Entry: Fall
NOTE: In order to take the first semester of Computer Aided Manufacturing courses, students must prove their skills in Mathematics, Reading Comprehension, and Writing with the following:
Placement into READ070 or higher
Placement into WRIT121 or higher
Placement into M111T or higher

For more information, please contact the Student Support Center




FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester

MCH120  Blueprint Reading and Interpretation for Machining 2
MCH130  Machine Shop 3
MCH132  Introduction to Engine Lathes 5
MCH134  Introduction to Mills 5
M111T  Technical Mathematics 3
Total Semester Credits 18

Spring Semester

MCH136  Advanced Lathes 5
MCH137  Advanced Mills 5
MCH139  Grinding Applications 2
MCH240  Metallurgy  2
MCH245  Shop Practices  2
WRIT121T Introduction to Technical Writing 3
Total Semester Credits 19

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester

MCH230  Tooling and Fixtures in CNC 2
MCH231  CNC Turning Operations Level 1 4
MCH232  CNC Turning Programming Operations 2 3
MCH234  Milling Operations Level 1 4
MCH235  CNC Millings Programming Operations 2 3
Total Semester Credits 16

Spring Semester

MCH233  CNC Turning Programming Operations 2 3
MCH236  CNC Milling Programming Operations 3 3
MCH237  CAD/CAM CNC turning Center 5
MCH238  CAD/CAM CNC Machining Center 5
HR110T  Human Relations 2
Total Semester Credits  18
TOTAL CREDITS 71



Machine Tool Technology


Gainful Employment

Certificate Name: Machine Tool Technology

Job Title & Subsequent Codes: 51-4041
Machinists, 51-4034 Lathe and Turning Machine Setters,
Operators and Tenders

PROGRAM STATISTICS

  • Number of students completing this certificate program in most recent fiscal year <10
  • Number of certificates completed within normal time: N/A
  • On-time completion rate: N/A
  • Job Placement Rate: N/A
  • Median loan debt for most recent program completers: N/A

Machine Tool Technology

Machine Tool Technology is designed to prepare students as entry-level machinists in many areas, including aerospace, computer industries, job shop, gun smithing, tool and die making, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) operator, and CNC programmer. Students will study machining processes and procedures using lathes, mills, drill presses, cylindrical grinders, and surface grinders.

The first year students will use a variety of manual machines, including engine lathes, horizontal and vertical mills, cylindrical grinders, surface grinders, drill presses, and radial arm drill. Students will work from blueprints and follow exact specifications and apply practical shop math to accomplish the required tasks. Much of the lab time will used for shop and project work.


Length of Program: 2 Semesters
Type of Program: Certificate of Applied Science
Semester of Entry: Fall

Fall Semester

MCH120  Blueprint Reading and Interpretation for Machining 2
MCH130  Machine Shop 3
MCH132  Introduction to Engine Lathes 5
MCH134  Introduction to Mills 5
HR100T  Human Relations 2
M111T  Technical Mathematics  3
Total Semester Credits 20

Spring Semester

MCH136 Advanced Lathes  5
MCH137  Advanced Mills 5
MCH139  Grinding Applications 2
MCH240  Metallurgy  2
MCH245  Shop Practices 2
WRIT121T Introduction to Technical Writing 3
Total Semester Credits 19
TOTAL CREDITS 39