Course Descriptions

Transferability Inititave


The Montana University System has been undergoing a state-wide curriculum review to improve the transfer processes between its campuses. Helena College has been fully engaged in that review. As a result, many of our course prefixes, numbers, and even titles have had to change in order to more clearly connect to similar courses at other campuses. The course content is typically not any different, and any course that you took under its old name and number will be considered equivalent to the new name and number. If it is difficult to find information on a course, please contact the Helena College Academic Affairs office at 447-6929 or search the Montana University System website for the new course information (mus.edu).

ACTG101 Accounting Procedures I

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
This course is a continuation of accounting transactions, financial statements, and analysis of accounts receivable, notes payable, notes receivable, merchandise inventory, property, plant, equipment, and long-term bonds. Accounting for partnerships and corporations is introduced.

ACTG102 Accounting Procedures II

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ACTG101 or consent of instructor
This course is a continuation of accounting transactions, financial statements, and analysis of accounts receivable, notes payable, notes receivable, merchandise inventory, property, plant, equipment, and long-term bonds. Accounting for partnerships and corporations is introduced.


ACTG125 Quick Books

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ACTG101 or consent of instructor
In this course, students will study Quick Books, an accounting system for small-business owners and bookkeepers. Topics include creating a company, setting up company lists, editing a preset chart of accounts, entering opening balances, entering sales and invoices, receiving payments and making deposits, handling expenses and bills, working with bank accounts, analyzing financial data, tracking and paying sales tax, managing inventory, and preparing payroll.


ACTG180 Payroll Accounting

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ACTG101, M108T or M121
This course is an introduction to payroll accounting emphasizes the process of accounting for payroll by employers and the rights of employees. Topics covered include the historical perspective of payroll accounting, the payroll accounting process from the legal issues surrounding hiring and maintaining records for employees, calculating gross pay, net pay, and payroll taxes, calculating employees deductions and benefits, recording payroll transactions, procedures for making payroll tax deposits, and completing employment tax reports.


ACTG201 Principles of Financial Accounting

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ACTG102, M108T or M121 or consent of instructor
This course emphasizes the understanding of fundamental accounting principles and procedures and will develop the student’s accounting problem-solving abilities and critical thinking. Topics covered include the basic structure of analyzing and recording transactions, establishing accounting policy, generally accepted accounting principles, control of cash, receivables and payables, merchandise inventory valuation methods, recording of property, plant, and equipment transactions, and long-term financing. Sources of equity capital for corporations and financial statements are analyzed.


ACTG202 Principles of Managerial Accounting

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ACTG201 or consent of instructor
This course emphasizes the fundamental concepts for planning, control, and decision-making. Topics covered include the basic structure of systems design, planning and control through standard costs, cost variance analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, operating and capital budgets, and using relevant costs in decision making.


ACTG205 Computerized Accounting

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ACTG101
This course is an introduction to accounting on microcomputers, which provides a realistic approach to computerized, integrated accounting principles. This course emphasizes set up and maintenance of accounts and transactions used in the general ledger, sales and accounts receivable, purchasing and accounts payable, cash receipts, cash disbursements, job costing, financial statement analysis, payroll setup and processing, budgets, and business analysis.


ACTG211 Income Tax Fundamentals

Credits: 3     Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course is a fundamental overview of tax schedules and forms as required by the Federal and State Internal Revenue Services.


ACTG215 Foundations of Governmental and Not for Profit Accounting

Credits:  3       Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher ACTG102 or consent of instructor

Accounting for governmental and nonprofit organizations is explored. Topics covered include objectives and principles of accounting for governmental entities, differences between business and government accounting, modified and accrual accounting, transactions for the general fund, special revenue funds, capital projects funds, debt service funds, permanent funds, proprietary funds (enterprise and internal service), and fiduciary funds. The influence of FASB and GASB on reporting for colleges and universities, governmental entities, and other nonprofit organizations is reviewed.


ACTG230 Introduction to Statewide Accounting, Budgeting, and Human Resource System (SABHRS)

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in ACTG101 or consent of instructor
This course gives students an overview of the accounting system utilized by state agencies. Course includes basic governmental accounting terminology and entry-level, practical application.


ACTG292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College University of Montana faculty member in the selected program area and approval of Division Chair
This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as faculty sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


ACTG298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College University of Montana faculty member in the selected program area and approval of Division Chair

This course is designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform professional skills outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work. The student initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent in the internship, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the Student, Faculty Supervisor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


ACTG299 Capstone: Accounting Portfolio

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-“ or higher in each of ACTG201 or ACTG202; COMX111; WRIT101 or WRIT121T; and consent of instructor

This is a capstone class utilizing accounting research, financial analysis, business knowledge, computer techniques, and communication skills in presenting comprehensive financial information to stakeholders and preparing a self-reflection professional portfolio.


AHMS144 Medical Terminology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

The course introduces students to complex medical terminology and facilitates students in recognizing that the meaning of complex medical terms can be determined by analyzing simpler components using prefixes, suffixes, and word roots. Correct pronunciation, definition, and spelling of these terms are derived through extensive usage of the textbook and computer software exercises. This course will connect the medical terminology to the basic structure and functioning of the systems of the human body including aspects of normal physiology and function, deviations from normal, diseases, and maintenance of health.


AHMS156 Medical Billing Fundamentals

Credits: 3 Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: None

AHMS 156 familiarizes students with the fundamentals of medical billing. Students will learn about commercial insurance carriers, Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, military insurance carriers, and worker’s compensation. Students will discuss insurance regulations and fee schedules, learn how to read an EOB and complete payment calculations. Students will also discuss HIPAA and its impact on healthcare.


AHMS164 Beginning Diagnosis Coding

Credits: 3 Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: None

This course covers the basic levels of theory and application of ICD-10-CM principles and guidelines for coding and sequencing diagnoses and procedures. Examples of patient records and coding exercises using the ICD-10 coding manual and simulation software will provide practice in coding and sequencing diagnoses. This course involves the application of ICD-10 diagnosis codes, knowledege of medical terminology and procedures, and the use of simulated patient case scenarios.


AHMS218 Complete Medical Coding

Credits: 3 Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AHMS144; NRSG100

Medical Coding is a fundamental skill requirement for the medical profession. Developing an excellent coding knowledge base will allow for future employment and advancement opportunities throughout the medical community. CPT, ICD9, & HCPCS codes will be used.


AHMS252 Computerized Medical Billing

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AHMS144; CAPP154, or consent of instructor

AHMS 252 familiarizes the student with the capabilities of medical practice software programs. Students learn and apply procedures such as patient scheduling, statement billing, payment reconciliation, insurance claim processing, procedure posting, HIPAA, medical records management, insurance company procedures, and insurance company regulations.


ANTY101 Anthropology and the Human Experience

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

A survey of the various subfields of anthropology, including archaeology, physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics.


ANTY103 Introduction to Latin American Studies

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally in Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

A contemplation of Latin America from a variety of perspectives and disciplines – as anthropologists, geographers, historians, political scientists, and artists, to name a few – in order to better understand its histories, cultures, landscapes, and communities.


ANTY250 Introduction to Archaeology

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

Archaeology is the study of past human cultures through their material remains. Archaeology uses many different approaches and tools to study and explain how people lived in the distant and not-so-distant past. Artifacts, sites, settlements, and landscapes may be studied to help reveal how people lived, how they saw themselves and their world, what the environment was like, and how these factors interrelated and changed through time. In this class you will gain an overview of what archaeology is, how archaeology is done, and what it can tell us about our world - past, present and perhaps even a glimpse of our future. This course is intended to be an introductory survey of archaeology for undergraduate students, either as an elective or as a foundation for further studies in archaeology.

ARTH160 Global Visual Culture

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introduction to a broad spectrum of the visual arts of Western and non-Western cultures from a Western art historical perspective with focus on seeing, thinking, and understanding art through critical analysis of form, content, function, and cultural context.


ARTZ105 Visual Language - Drawing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course explores the principles of design, as well as application of those principles through a wide variety of hands-on projects.


ARTZ106 Visual Language - 2-D Foundations

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

This introductory drawing course covers basic principles of drawing and design in art. Major areas of study are space, form, volume, tone, texture, and line, using various drawing materials and techniques.


ARTZ221 Painting I

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ARTZ106 or consent of instructor

Practice and principles of painting in traditional media, including watercolor, acrylic, and oil painting. The course emphasis is on acquiring and refining technical skills, composition, and application of color theory. Research in historical and contemporary strategies.


ASTR110 Introduction to Astronomy

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: None

This course provides an introduction to astronomy with a lab component for the non-science major. Topics include the tools of astronomy, the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy, cosmology, and life in the universe.


AUTO104 Automotive Mechanics Core

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course covers proper shop safety procedures, safety materials, basic hand tool operation and identification, pneumatic and hydraulic tool operation and identification, vehicle hoist operation and safety, material safety data sheets (MSDS), precision measurement tools and application, fasteners, and different fastener grades.


AST108 Automotive Manual Drivetrains

Credits: 7
Co-requisites: AUTO104
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the theory of operation and service procedures related to dry friction clutches, manual transmissions/transaxles, front drive axles, rear drive axles, drivelines, transfer cases, and locking hubs. Students will disassemble, inspect, and re-assemble selected power train components.


AST118 Brakes and Chassis

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST108, AST130, AST160

This course focuses on the function, diagnosis, and service practices of current automotive braking, steering and suspension systems. Students will learn about disc and drum brake hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical systems, to include ABS systems. Students will also study current steering, and suspension systems, to include 4 wheel alignments, suspension system, and tire service.


AST130 Introduction to Automotive Electronics

Credits: 7
Co-requisites: AUTO104
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to give Automotive Technology students the basic electrical/electronic foundation needed to build on in other advanced courses requiring electrical and electronic knowledge. The course progresses from electrical/electronic theory, circuits and circuit failure, meters, and components through to starting and charging systems. The lab component of this course is designed to provide the hands-on activities common to automotive electrical/electronic applications. Emphasis will be placed on developing a knowledge and skill base needed to diagnose and repair general automotive electrical system malfunctions.


AST160 Automotive Engine Repair

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104

This course covers the theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures associated with automotive engine repair. Students will learn automotive engine theory and will disassemble, assemble, and run electronically-controlled, overhead cam training engines and their related components.


AST172 Automotive Heating/Air Conditioning

Credits: 5
Co-requisites: AST230
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130

This course is designed to provide Automotive Technology students with the knowledge and skills required to understand, service, and repair mobile air conditioning systems as used in the automotive industry. The course content includes heat and refrigeration principles, component function and interrelation concerns, and EPA requirements. The lab component is designed to provide the hands-on activities common to automotive, mobile air conditioning applications.


AST230 Electrical/Electronic Systems II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130

This course covers theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures related to selected electrical and electronically controlled systems. Systems/subjects covered include: vehicle communication networks, supplemental inflatable restraint systems, anti-theft systems, cruise control, remote keyless entry, and power accessories.


AST262 Engine Performance I

Credits: 8
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130, AST230

This course covers theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures as they relate to engine performance. Subjects studied will include the effects of engine design on performance, federal emissions legislation, fuel composition and characteristics, ignition systems, electronic fuel injection, and emission control systems. Students will learn to use industry-accepted test procedures and test equipment to determine the cause of degraded engine performance, drivability complaints, and/or excessive exhaust emissions.


AST264 Engine Performance II

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130, AST160, AST230, AST262

This course covers principles of operation, safety practices, service, and diagnostic procedures related to computerized engine management systems. Alternative fuel and hybrid electric vehicles will be explored with special emphasis given to the development of proper diagnostic skills and the use of state of the art electronic test equipment.


AST270 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130, AST230, AST262

This course covers the theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures related to hydraulically controlled and computerized automatic transmissions and transaxles. Students will disassemble, rebuild, and reassemble selected transmissions/transaxles.


AST280 Applied Lab Experience and Light Repair

Credits: 5
Co-requisites: AST264 , AST270
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST108, AST118, AST160, AST172, AST230, AST262

This is a “capstone” experience course for Automotive Technology students in their second year, intended to apply their knowledge base acquired in previous courses to additional, repetitive lab experiences, thereby developing their critical thinking and physical service skills. It is important to note that this is not a “hobby shop” or “rebuild” course and will focus on “quick turn-around” light repair and problem solving. Emphasis will be placed on vehicle service practices, preventative maintenance, component diagnosis and replacement, electrical/electronic systems diagnosis and repair, heating and A/C service, and “under car” service and repair.


AVMT100 Introduction to Aviation Maintenance/ Mathematics/Basic Physics

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces students to many facets of aviation maintenance and its future. The course will also cover mathematical concepts such as powers and roots, ratio and proportion, and practical applications of plane geometry and algebra and basic physics, to include mechanical advantage, conversion between forms of energy, vibrations, the gas laws, heat, and pressure.


AVMT105 Basic Electricity

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the elements of basic electricity and lays the foundation for understanding electrical circuitry concepts, the principles of electrical power generation and distribution, and aircraft electrical systems functions. This course will also describe current flow and analyze circuit operation in both theory and practical applications.


AVMT110 Aircraft Drawings/Weight and Balance

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft drawings, which enhance the ability to communicate ideas, to understand and explain an operation, and to record what has been done to an aircraft using symbols and different types of drawings such as views and projections used in aircraft maintenance. The course will also introduce weight and balance for safety and efficiency of flight, for maintaining the weight of an aircraft and its center of gravity within its specified limits. The course will cover the theory of aircraft weight and balance, weight and balance information, and the procedures for weighing an aircraft, and how to find the aircraft center of gravity and perform adverse-load center of gravity checks.


AVMT115 Materials and Processes/Fluid Lines and Fittings/ Cleaning and Corrosion Control

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course provides students the opportunity to inspect aircraft components for wear, identify aircraft hardware and materials, learn the basic theory of heat-treatment processes, nondestructive inspection procedures, and perform dye-penetrant and magnetic particle inspections. The course will also cover fluid lines and fittings, which must be of the correct size and material. The student is introduced to the selection of materials for both rigid and flexible fluid lines and to the proper installation of various types of aircraft fittings on these lines. The student is also taught the proper installation and inspection of high-pressure fluid lines in an aircraft. This course also covers the importance of recognizing and properly treating an aircraft structure that shows evidence of corrosion. This introduces the student to the selection of cleaning materials, with emphasis on their relationship to the type of material being cleaned. It stresses the identification of the various types of corrosion, the evaluation of corrosion damage, the proper way of removing the corrosion deposits, and treatment of the corroded areas.


AVMT120 Ground Operation and Servicing

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces servicing and ground operations of aircraft and covers the choice and identification of fuels for both reciprocating and turbine engine-powered aircraft and the necessary precautions to observe when fueling an aircraft. Since awareness of ground operations and hazards is emphasized in this section, the student is also introduced to “Safety in the Shop and on the Flight Line.” This increment also covers the proper procedure for starting reciprocating and turbine engines and the procedures for proper engine run-up, aircraft movement, and tie-down.


AVMT125 Maintenance Publications/Forms and Records/ Mechanic Privileges and Limitations

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the importance of understanding the regulations governing aviation maintenance and the information furnished by the aircraft, engine, and component manufacturers, and it emphasizes the importance of the legal aspects of aviation maintenance. The student will learn how to properly describe the work done to an aircraft and must be able to make the proper maintenance record entries, and explain these records and forms step-by-step to what is expected of the mechanic by the aircraft owner and what is allowed by the FAA.


AVMT130 Basic Aerodynamics

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces knowledge of basic aerodynamics, which deals with the motion of air and the forces acting on bodies moving relative to the air. In the study of aerodynamics, the student learns about why and how an airplane flies. Although aerodynamics is a complex subject, exploring the fundamental principles which govern flight is the main challenge in understanding what makes an airplane fly and begins with learning the four forces of flight, which are lift, weight, thrust, and drag.


AVMT135 Assembly and Rigging/Airframe Inspection

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces knowledge of the correct assembly and rigging of an aircraft, which is vital to safe and efficient flight. This section explains the relationship between aircraft rigging and the aerodynamics of flight. The course also introduces how to determine the legal airworthiness of an aircraft, its powerplant, and components. The student will learn the inspection aspects from a legal standpoint in which the emphasis is placed on the practical aspects and performance of required inspections.


AVMT140 Sheet Metal

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

This course introduces knowledge of sheet metal structures, which is one of the most important types of modern aircraft construction. This section gives students a solid lesson in the types and materials for metallic aircraft structures, a discussion that includes the stresses on aircraft structure and the strength of various metal materials. The student is taught to install conventional, special rivets, and fasteners; hand form, layout, and bend sheet metal; and to inspect and repair sheet metal structures.


AVMT145 Composites and Plastics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces knowledge of nonmetallic composite structures, which is the second most important type of modern aircraft construction. This section gives students a solid lesson in the types of composite materials and their manufacture details, a discussion that includes the foundation for the understanding of “Nonmetallic Aircraft Structures” and “Composite Structure Inspection and Repair.”


AVMT150 Wood Structures

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft wood structures; the student will learn and be able to identify defects and the different kinds of woods suitable for their application, describe the kinds of glues and gluing techniques, and to restore old aircraft that have wood wing spars, ribs, and plywood structures.


AVMT155 Aircraft Covering/Aircraft Finishes

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the student to the application and maintenance of fabric covered aircraft. They will learn about how a fabric covering is properly attached to aircraft structures. The student will become familiar with the different types of covering materials that are used to cover an aircraft plus the dope fillers, paints, and rejuvenator finishes used on the fabric.


AVMT160 Aircraft Welding

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the knowledge of welding, which is important because modern structures are so complex and highly stressed that welding is usually a specialized type of repair done under highly controlled conditions. This section concludes the discussion of Metallic Aircraft Structures with a detailed description of the types, tools, materials, and methods of welding for aircraft construction, maintenance, and repair.


AVMT165 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Power Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces hydraulic and pneumatic power systems, which are used to operate many of the vital systems, such as landing gear retraction, brakes, and powered flight controls. The students will inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair these systems and will learn to work safely with these fluids and their pressurized containers.


AVMT170 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems/Position and Warning Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces landing gear systems, which are subject to greater stresses than any other airframe system; therefore, the student must completely understand these vital components. This section includes lectures and schematic diagrams of these systems, exploded views of the assemblies, and illustrations of the workings of brake control systems, and the required maintenance. The different systems are covered in three areas: anti-skid brakes and their systems; electrical circuits and landing gear actuation; and warning systems for instruments that indicate and measure movement.


AVMT205 Aircraft Electrical Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces electricity and airframe electrical systems. Basic electricity is taught along with typical airframe electrical circuits. The student will learn both general diagram symbols and specific electrical systems along with industry-accepted methods of installation and proper testing equipment used.


AVMT210 Aircraft Fuel Systems/Fire Protection Systems/Ice and Rain Control Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the complex system of tanks, valves, and pumps of modern aircraft. The student will learn these systems in order to service them efficiently and safely. This section describes the various aircraft fuels and explains the fuel system requirements. This course also introduces fire protection systems and shows that fire is an ever possible danger in an aircraft, and that the student must be aware of the nature of fire and the appropriate methods and agents for detecting and extinguishing aircraft fires. This section explains how these protection systems work. This course also covers ice and rain control systems.


AVMT215 Cabin Atmosphere Control Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This section covers maintaining an aircraft cabin environment with the proper pressure, temperature, humidity, and air movement, which is more than a matter of comfort; it is also a safety factor. This section backs up its discussion of these systems by starting with an explanation of “Human Needs in Flight” and how the atmosphere, the chemistry of oxygen, and the physics of heat, temperature, and pressure relate to this topic.


AVMT220 Aircraft Instrument Systems/Communication and Navigation Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces instrument systems that are needed to provide the flight crew with data relating to the operating of the various flight and powerplant systems. This section describes the instruments and the basic operating principles of the systems that run them. The student will learn the installation and maintenance of these systems. Aircrafts depend upon electronic navigation and communication equipment. The student will learn their responsibility for determining the condition of the installed equipment and its interface with the aircraft itself. The student will also receive a detailed discussion of communication and navigation systems, as well as basic radio theory, to provide an understanding of how these systems should work.


AVMT225 Development of Aircraft Powerplants

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course will introduce the student to the development of aircraft powerplants from the Wright brothers’ first engine, to the modern piston, turbine, and turboprop engines that are used on aircraft and helicopters throughout the world today.


AVMT230 Reciprocating Engines and Systems

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft powerplants that are of the reciprocating (piston) type. This section introduces the student to the different types of reciprocating engines, which include the detailed material that covers the step-by-step, hands-on procedures for reciprocating engine inspection, troubleshooting, repair, and overhaul. The course includes the operation of fuel metering components, induction and exhaust systems, heat dissipation, and starter systems.


AVMT235 Turbine Engines and Systems

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft powerplants that are of the turbine type. This section introduces the student to the different types of turbine engines, which include the detailed material that covers the step-by-step, hands-on procedures for turbine engine inspection, troubleshooting, and repair. The course includes the operation of fuel metering components, induction and exhaust systems, method of heat dissipation, and starter systems.


AVMT240 Engine Instrument Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

A knowledge of the conditions in an aircraft engine allows the flight crew to operate it in the most efficient and safest manner. For this reason, modern aircraft powerplants are equipped with sensors to monitor all of the vital parameters. This section covers all required powerplant instrumentation and also discusses the various types of electronic, digital, and computerized instrumentation of today’s aircraft.


AVMT245 Engine Electrical Systems/Auxiliary Power Unit

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

In this section the methods of generating and controlling electrical energy are discussed. It includes a refresher of electrical principles as they apply to powerplant operation and of each control system in detail. There is also a lecture on aircraft electrical system installation, to prepare the student for the practical application of electrical system service and maintenance. The student will also learn about the APU (auxiliary power unit) system that is used to provide electricity and compressed air when the aircraft is on the ground and the main engines are not operating.


AVMT250 Engine Fire Protection Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces how modern aircraft powerplants are protected from fire with effective fire-detection and high-rate-discharge fire-extinguishing systems. These are described in detail so the student understands the practical application necessary in the servicing, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of these systems.


AVMT255 Propellers and Unducted Fans

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces all aspects of propeller theory, as a foundation for the understanding of propeller maintenance, repair, and inspection. A propeller is an airfoil, rotated by either a reciprocating or turbine engine. The propeller adds energy to the air passing through it by accelerating it rearward to produce a forward thrust. This course also introduces a new development in aircraft propulsion that is known as an ultra-high bypass (UHB) turbofan, or unducted fan (UDF) engine. A special lecture is devoted to the discussion of this engine.


BFIN205 Personal Finance

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of ACTG101; BGEN105 and M108T or M121

This course is designed to assist students in making effective personal financial decisions. Topics covered are concepts, strategies and techniques in analyzing financial situations and investment opportunities from the individual’s perspective.


BFIN265 Introduction to Business Finance

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of ACTG101; BGEN105 and M108T or M121

This course is designed to assist students in making effective financial business decisions. Topics include time value of money, cash flow, financial ratio analysis, long term financing/equity decisions, working capital management, personal finance, and the influence of the economic environment on a business’s financial considerations.


BGEN105 Introduction to Business

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT095 or placement in WRIT101 or WRIT121T

This course introduces the nature of business and the trends that change the way business is conducted. Topics covered in this course include the business environment, starting a business, management, ethics, social responsibility, human resources, marketing, and finance.


BGEN201 Foundations of Business Ethics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105 and WRIT101 or WRIT121
This course is designed to apply business concepts in studying ethics. The course will help students differentiate between ethical and unethical practices in the business world. Topics covered include: basic principles of ethics, social costs, justice and fairness, utilitarianism, free market and rights, ethics in the marketplace, globalization, ethics in the role of government in business ethics, business and external exchanges, and ethics relating to internal constituencies (employee issues).


BGEN235 Business Law

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course is an overview of business law, including the judicial system and procedures. Emphasis will be on ethics and law, tort law, contract law, sales and lease laws, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy laws, and legal ramifications for organizational types.


BGEN236 Business Law II

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN235

This course is an overview of business law including the judicial system and procedures. Emphasis will be on ethics and law, contract law, warranties and product liability, consumer protection laws, personal property, real property, wills, intestacy, and trusts, business organizations and regulation, and the impact of computers and e-commerce on the law.


BGEN292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College faculty member in the selected program area and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as faculty sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the Student, Faculty, Sponsor, Division Chair and the Associate Dean.


BGEN298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College faculty member in the selected program area and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform professional skills outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work. The student initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent in the internship, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the Student, Faculty Supervisor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


BGEN299 Capstone: Business

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of ACTG101; BFIN265; BMGT210 or BMKT225; and WRIT101 or WRIT121; and consent of instructor

This capstone course helps students synthesize the learning process with the production of a Business Plan for launching of a new small business venture. Students utilize communication skills, computer skills, accounting skills, and management problem-solving techniques toward the development of the culminating project.


BIOB101 Discover Biology

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: BIOB102
Prerequisites: none

This nonmajors Biology course introduces the student to the fundamentals of biological organization, the scientific method, cellular biology, molecular biology, genetics, ecology, and origins. Relationships between form and function, acquisition and the use of energy, and continuity among generations will be addressed.


BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: BIOB101
Prerequisites: none

This nonmajors biology lab course accompanies the Discover Biology lecture.


BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

The first course in a biology sequence is an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of general biology with an emphasis on lab experiences, critical thinking, problem solving, and the scientific method. Areas of study include organic chemistry and biochemistry, cellular biology, cell growth, genetics and genetic engineering, reproduction, cell metabolism, ecology, evolution theory, and classification systems in biology.


BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOB160

The second course in the biology sequence emphasizes study of the principles of biology within specific classifications such as kingdoms and species. Areas of study include viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plant, invertebrates, vertebrates, and human biology.


BIOB260 Cellular and Molecular Biology with Lab

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY 143/144 and BIOB 101 or higher

An introduction to the biology of the cell, including the nature of organization of the cell, growth, basic bioenergetic and enzyme function, cell environment, membrane structure and function, the chemical and physical mechanisms of metabolism in plants and animals, and the work performed by cells. Laboratory is included.


BIOH104 Basic Human Biology

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This one-semester course covers the basic anatomy and physiology of the human body. Lecture will concentrate on the physiology (function) of several body systems including the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary systems and how they contribute to homeostasis of the body. Lab will mainly concentrate on the anatomy (form) of bones, muscles, brain and spinal cord, and the heart.


BIOH201 Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: none

This is the first course of a two-semester course series. In this course the student will build on the general principles of cell biology and basic chemistry. Structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems will be studied, with emphasis on homeostasis, control and integration of the human body. Lecture will concentrate on physiology (function) while the lab experience will concentrate on anatomy (form), including histology (cellular level).


BIOH211 Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOH201

This is the second course of a two-semester course series. In this course the student will build on the general principles of cell biology and basic chemistry, structure and function of the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, renal system and reproductive system. Lecture will concentrate on physiology (function) while the lab experience will concentrate on anatomy (form), including histology (cellular level).


BIOM250 Microbiology for Health Science

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: BIOM251
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOB160 or BIOH201

This course will survey both general and medical microbiology. It will emphasize medical microbiology and place it in perspective with the whole of human health. Bacterial, fungal, and viral agents of disease will be studied and the methods for their identification and control.


BIOM251 Microbiology for Health Science Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: BIOM250
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOB160 or BIOH201

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in BIOM250 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting. This course can also function as a stand-alone course for students who have completed the lecture component of microbiology previously.


BMGT205 Professional Communication Fundamentals

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Placement in WRIT101 or WRIT121T

The course recognizes and creates effective approaches and styles for written, oral, and nonverbal communications appropriate to organizational situation, nature of message, and audience. The course addresses professional document and presentation designs, choices of media, and tones for individual and organizational communications.


BMGT210 Small Business Entrepreneurship

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course introduces the student to the entrepreneurial mindset necessary to discover opportunities for markets and situations in which a small business can be developed successfully. Topics covered include the nature of small business, seeking entrepreneurial opportunities, developing new ventures, marketing and managing a small business, and the social and legal environment of businesses.


BMGT215 Human Resource Management

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course introduces the student to an overview of the background of human resource management, acquisition of human resources, training and development of employees, compensation of human resources, and labor relations. Topics covered include human resource planning, recruitment, selection and training, equal opportunity and employment laws, job analysis and design, performance management systems, compensation and benefits, and employee/labor relations.


BMGT235 Management

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105 and WRIT101 or WRIT121

Students learn efficient and effective use of resources in achieving organizational goals. Topics include the environment of management, the functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, and decision-making for organizational leaders.


BMGT263 Legal Issues in Human Resources

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course introduces the student to an overview of legal issues in human resources and employment law. Topics covered include employment relationships, hiring, termination, employment discrimination, employment regulation (wage and hour, safety, workers’ compensation), and employee evaluation.


BMIS270 Management Information Systems Foundations for Business

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI172

The field of Management Information Systems (MIS) is an exciting academic discipline that is integral to all business activities. This course is designed to introduce students to MIS and examine how these powerful systems have fundamentally reshaped modern organizations, as well as our society. This course focuses on the key components of MIS - people, software, hardware, data, and telecommunications, highlighting how these components can be integrated and managed to create and sustain competitive advantages.


BMIS285 Fundamentals of Management Information Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: none

The Fundamentals of Management Information Systems course is designed to introduce technology students to information systems. This course focuses on the key components of information systems – people, software, hardware, data, and telecommunications. Technology students will learn the terminology used in the information technology (IT) field as well as how information flows within a business. They will also gain an understanding of how local, regional, national, and global businesses utilize IT to gain competitive advantage.


BMKT225 Marketing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of BGEN105 and WRIT101 or WRIT121

This course introduces the student to making marketing decisions. Topics covered include the marketplace and consumers, marketing plans, market analysis, the marketing mix, and global marketing.


BMKT240 Advertising

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals and terminology of advertising. Topics covered are the role of advertising, demographic segmentation, advertising psychology, advertising strategies, media strengths and weaknesses, layout and design, and careers in advertising. Class participants will develop their own advertisements using a variety of media.


CAPP100 Short Courses: Computer Literacy

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the students to computer hardware and software and their uses. The course provides basic computer literacy concerning terminology, careers, and social issues related to computer, network, and information technology issues including ethics, crime, and copyright issues.


CAPP106 Short Courses: Computer Applications

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This course is an overview of the uses of the microcomputer in the technical and health fields. Topics will include the microcomputer operating system and overviews of word processing and spreadsheet applications.


CAPP131 Basic MS Office

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course provides students with basic computer literacy, terminology, career information, and social issues related to computers, as well as network and information technology. Topics include issues with computer use, ethics, crime, and copyright laws. Students will explore a computer operating system, word processing and spreadsheet application software, and the internet to find solutions for real world problems. Through hands-on activities participants will learn effective uses of a Windows-based computer as a tool to increase productivity..


CAPP153 MS Powerpoint

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None
Using MS PowerPoint, students will apply effective design concepts and features to create readable, well-balanced presentations to use in a business or educational setting. A variety of appropriate presentation techniques will be discussed and applied.


CAPP154 MS Word

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None

Students will learn basic principles of word processing. Emphasis is placed on creating, saving, editing, and formatting documents along with some of the special features of word processing software. This course uses Microsoft Word.


CAPP155 MS Publisher

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: None

Students will learn the basic principles of design as it applies to the publication of business cards, newsletters, invoices, business flyers, and other business publications. Emphasis is placed on creating, saving, editing, and designing publications using text and graphic elements. MS Publisher will be used in this course.


CAPP156 MS Excel

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: none

spreadsheets for personal and business tasks. Students will learn basic principles such as formatting a workbook, working with formulas and functions, and creating charts and tables. Students will also learn important spreadsheet concepts such as order of precedence in formulas, function syntax, absolute and relative cell references, what-if analysis, and data validation.


CAPP158 Basic MS Access

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course highlights the role of data management and relational databases in the business environment. Students learn how to create, edit, and manage large amounts of data with Microsoft Access. Students will learn basic database design, how to create tables and forms, sorting techniques, and how to run queries.


CAPP208 E-Learning Application and Web 2.0+ Basics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

This course explores connections between technology and the teaching and learning processes through current research in instructional technology. Students will examine industry standard e-learning development tools for training in a virtual environment including various asynchronous, synchronous, rapid development, and web-based technologies. Students will compare and contrast popular e-learning authoring tools. The tools demonstrated in this course will include lecture capture, web authoring, wikis, virtual reality software, video editing, Google Docs, and others. Students will gain a better understanding of which media are best suited to meet their learning objectives and/or business training goals.


CAPP266 Advanced MS Excel

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CAPP156 or CSCI172

This is an advanced course that builds upon the skills learned in CAPP156 MS Excel or CSCI 172 Intro to Computer Modeling. Excel spreadsheets can be used for a variety of accounting applications, including general ledger, payroll, taxation, budgeting, and forecasting. Spreadsheets are also valuable tools for personal finance.


CHMY121 Introduction to General Chemistry

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: CHMY122
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the basic principles of chemistry and the physical world at a microscopic scale. Topics include the atomic model of matter, energy, chemical bonds and reactions, the states of matter, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry. The course integrates lecture and homework assignments to provide students practical examples of applications of course material to “real world” situations.


CHMY122 Introduction to General Chemistry Lab

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: CHMY121
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY121 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CHMY123 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY124
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY121 and CHMY122 or consent of instructor

This course is designed to expand on the information presented in Introduction to General Chemistry, providing students with a working knowledge of the basics of organic and biologic chemistry. Topics include the basic organic functional groups and their reaction properties, and basic biologic molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes and how these molecules form and function in biologic systems. The course integrates lecture, homework assignments, and lab exercises to provide students practical examples of applications of course material to “real world” situations.


CHMY124 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY123
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY121/CHMY122 or consent of instructor

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY123 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CHMY141 College Chemistry I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY142
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M121

This is the first semester of a two-semester college chemistry sequence. Topics covered include atomic structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, the periodic table, and the states of matter. The experimental and mathematical aspects of chemistry are emphasized.


CHMY142 College Chemistry I Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY141
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in M121
This is the lab portion of CHMY141. It is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY141.


CHMY143 College Chemistry II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requistes: CHMY144
Prerequisites: A “C-”or higher in CHMY141 and M121

This is the second semester of a two-semester college chemistry sequence designed for students entering a science, engineering, or pre-med field of study. Covered topics include solution chemistry; chemical equilibria, kinetics, and thermodynamic; acids and bases; electrochemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Heavy emphasis will be placed the mathematical aspects of chemistry and on making connections to “real-world” applications of chemistry.


CHMY144 College Chemistry II Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requistes: CHMY143
Prerequisites: A “C-”or higher in CHMY141 and M121

This is the lab portion of College Chemistry II. It is designed to reinforce the material learned in CHMY143.


CHMY221 Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY222
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY143/144

This is the first semester of a one-year sequence with emphasis on fundamental concepts of structure, nomenclature, properties and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds, and an introduction to biochemical molecules. Laboratory offered as CHMY222.


CHMY222 Organic Chemistry I Lab

Credits: 2      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY221
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY143/144

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY221 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CHMY223 Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY224
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY221/222

This is the second semester of a one-year sequence with emphasis on functional group interconversions, chemistry of aromatic compounds, multistep reaction pathways, molecular structure determinations using spectroscopic methods, retrosynthetic analysis, and introduction to biological chemistry. Laboratory included.


CHMY224 Organic Chemistry II Lab

Credits: 2      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY223
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY221/222

This integral lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY223 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or equivalent score on writing placement

This course is a survey of the history and philosophy of American justice concepts with the emphasis on present day practical application through the efforts of the law enforcement, court, and correction segments of the criminal justice system.


COMM132 Interpersonal Communications

Credits: 1      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in COMX111 or consent of instructor

Interpersonal communication, or how humans communicate with one another in our personal lives, impacts the function and form of communication in other areas. Through a theoretical study of interpersonal communication students will gain an understanding of the maintenance and termination of platonic, romantic, and family relationships. In addition, we will explore topics of attraction, initiation, commitment, intimacy, child-parent communication, and destructive behavior.


COMM133 Small Group Communication

Credits: 1      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in COMX111 or consent of instructor

This course studies group communication processes. Focusing on communication theory, the course will dissect how groups communicate effectively and ineffectively and the impact on day-to-day human relations.


COMX111 Introduction to Public Speaking

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Development of oral communication skills through an emphasis on audience analysis, organization of ideas, and delivery of spoken messages.


COMX250 Introduction to Public Relations

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 or WRIT121T, or consent of instructor

This course introduces students to theory and to practice of public relations, with practical application of public relations, writing, and delivery strategies. Additionally, students will study the media and produce a communications plan.


CRWR212 Introduction to Nonfiction Workshop

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: None

Students will gain confidence and competence in writing through journal writing and then taking those journal entries and creating essays. The journal exercises will be guided exercises, designed to elicit a variety of responses and ideas from the students.


CRWR240 Introduction to Creative Writing Workshop

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semestery
Prerequisites: None

This course is designed to give students experience with generating and developing original works of poetry and short fiction through two methods: analysis and discussion of works by practicing authors, and drafting and polishing their own work through workshops and writing tanks.


CSCI100 Introduction to Programming

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introduction to elementary programming techniques using Pseudo code, flowcharting, and C#. A wide range of programs will be written by the student and run on a computer. Students learn the techniques of looping, functions and sub/routines, arrays, variables and data types, user input/output, file input/output, and appropriate programming practices.


CSCI111 Programming with Java I

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100

This course offers a thorough introduction to the concepts behind object-oriented software development, including the terminology and methodologies utilizing the Java Programming Language. This course provides the student with the fundamentals of programming with a focus on object-oriented techniques. These skills are needed to work effectively in the area of information technology. The ability to understand the relationship between data and the algorithmic manipulation of data is crucial in IT related fields.


CSCI115 Programming with PERL

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: CSCI100 or consent of instructor

This course will familiarize the student in the use of the PERL scripting language for automating administrative and business operations. Topics include file system management, user administration, directory services, database administration, log files, security, and network monitoring. Students will implement PERL scripts on Windows and Linux platforms.


CSCI121 Programming with Java II

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111

This course covers some of the more advanced topics of Java Standard Edition. Topics covered include Java integration to databases (JDBC), Generics, Collections, Object Serialization, Network Sockets, Advanced GUI development with Swing components, and multi-threaded applications. This course does NOT cover Servlets, JavaServer Pages, or Enterprise JavaBeans as they are covered in CT262.


CSCI172 Introduction to Computer Modeling

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None

This course covers problem solving with spreadsheets and databases using the computer to analyze a set of data; presentation of results of analysis.


CSCI206 .NET Applications

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111 and CSCI240

This course covers advanced desktop and web application features of the .NET framework. Students will learn Exception Handling, Collections, Multithreading, .NET XML Web Services, ADO.NET, ADO.NET Entity Framework, Stored Procedures, and Object Oriented Programming. Students will use C# language and Microsoft SQL Server for all projects.


CSCI210 Web Programming

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100, CSCI240, and MART145

This course provides students with skills necessary to use the PHP scripting language to develop dynamic Web-based applications. Topics of study include the fundamentals of the scripting, using PHP with HTML forms, creating functions, and integrating with MySQL databases.


CSCI211 Client Side Web Development

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100 and MART145

This course focuses on the concepts of client side web development including AJAX Development covering JavaScript, DOM, XML, and Asynchronous page updates.


CSCI212 Web Server Administration

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ITS224, ITS280 and ITS164 or NTS104

In this course, students explore issues dealing with building and managing a web server. Topics will include web server and network issues, Domain Name System, TCP/IP connectivity, server setup, web site administration, Internet commerce, and security. Students will implement web servers using Apache and IIS.


CSCI221 Systems Analysis and Design

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI240

This course studies the concepts and skills needed to analyze and design information systems. The primary focus in this course is to prepare the student to understand the systems development life cycle. Special emphasis is placed on business functions, process flows, dataflow diagramming, entity relationship diagramming, and database requirements.


CSCI236 XML Data Processing

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI240

The course studies the use of XML data in data processing and its use in data transmission between organizations. Students will learn to create and validate XML data documents. Students will create applications that generate, transform, query, and transmit XML data. Students will create applications that manipulate XML data using professional software development tools on multiple platforms.


CSCI238 Standards Based Mobile Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111 and MART145

This is an introductory course in developing mobile applications utilizing industry standard languages, tools, and frameworks. Applications will be created using standards based HTML 5, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) 3, and JavaScript along with frameworks to assist in the deployment to different mobile platforms. Frameworks such as PhoneGap will be utilized to gain access to platform devices and sensors.


CSCI240 Databases and SQL

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: none

This course focuses on the concepts of relational databases and includes tables, records and typed fields, primary and foreign keys, and database normalization, and a thorough coverage of Structured Query Language “SQL”. Through a variety of exercises, the student will learn how to model a business enterprise using the entity-relationship approach to relational database design. The Oracle database is used for all exercises.


CSCI242 Enterprise Applications

Credits: 4     Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111, and CSCI240

The topics covered are applicable to enterprise database platforms such as Oracle’s 10g or IBM’s DB2. Students will get in-depth, hands-on experience creating numerous increasingly complex Java applications using enterprise tools and frameworks. The Hibernate Object Relational Mapping framework will be used for database interaction. Java XML Web Services will be covered in the REST and SOAP styles.


CSCI276 Application Security

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111 and CSCI240

The course studies the best practices in the development of secure software applications. Through code reviews, students will analyze and test application code for security vulnerabilities such as SQL injection, XML injection, cross site scripting, buffer overflow, and improper error handling. Students will analyze different types of security attacks and discuss countermeasures to safeguard applications and data. Security issues of particular programming languages, platforms, and application types will also be discussed. Network and physical security are not covered in this course but are covered in ITS218 Network Security.


CSCI292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Instructor approval

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as faculty sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, division chair, and the Associate Dean.


CSCI298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Instructor approval

Designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform work outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work.


CSCI299 Thesis/Capstone

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Instructor approval

This course is a self-directed, integrated, and applied learning opportunity that integrates the coursework, knowledge, and skills gained in Computer Technology coursework. Students will be matched with an organization that needs assistance on an Information Technology project. Students will work with the organization and assigned Computer Technology Faculty to complete the project. Project demonstration and required documentation will be presented at project completion.


CSTN100 Fundamentals of Construction Technology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students in attendance will learn the importance that safety has in the construction industry. Students will learn to identify and follow safe work practices as well as inspection of power equipment (portable and stationary) and hand tools. Students will also demonstrate the safe and proper use of each tool.


CSTN120 Carpentry Basics and Rough-In Framing

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course will introduce the student to the different components used for residential floor systems (joists, rim joist hangers, etc.) wall systems (king studs, timmer studs, headers, wall plates, rough sills, etc.) roof systems (both truss and rafter) and basic stair building, with an emphasis placed on platform framing.


CSTN124 Cabinet Installation, Interior/Finish/Paint

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course will include installing interior doors and hardware, interior casing, and base trim installation. Painting, staining, and application of clear finishes will be used to complete surfaces and cabinet installation.


CSTN137 Insulation and Energy Building Practices

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course will introduce students to energy efficient building and insulating techniques and practices.


CSTN145 Exterior Finish, Metal Soffit and Fascia

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Students will learn about the installation of windows, exterior doors, locksets, and hardware. Also covered is the installation of exterior corners, soffit, fascia, cornices, and exterior sidings.


CSTN148 Blueprint Reading, Codes and Estimating

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Covers a graphic approach to problems involving residential drawings in orthographic and perspective design. Students will study blueprint symbols and working drawings and develop a residential house plan, and develop a list of materials, timeline, and cost breakdown from this working blueprint.


CSTN150 Drywall Application and Finishing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Students will learn about the different thickness and types of drywall and where each thickness and types are used and then the student will learn proper taping, the different finishing, and texture techniques.


CSTN160 Construction Concepts and Building Lab

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces and allows the students to practice the building procedures learned, along with the safety skills to be used in building.


CSTN161 Construction Concepts and Building Lab II

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Students will demonstrate installation of insulation, vapor barriers, windows, doors (both interior and exterior), siding soffits, fascia, cornices, gypsum board, cabinets, and application of interior finish, painting, staining, and clear coat finish of interior trim.


CSTN171 Site Prep, Foundations, and Concrete Installation

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160, CSTN161, and CSTN230

This course covers basic site layout, distance measurement, and leveling. Students will be introduced to concrete formulas, foundation and flatwork, as well as handling and placing concrete. The use of manufactured forms will also be covered in this course.


CSTN175 Roofing Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces the student to the materials used and the installation techniques of the various roofs. The student will learn about the different types of asphalt, fiberglass, cedar shakes, shingles, and the different styles of metal roofing, delta rib, standing seam, and metal shakes. Students will learn the different methods of sealing up the valleys. The students will be installing fiberglass shingles on a roof with a cricket for practice. The students will make a water tight valley using the newer weaving pattern design.


CSTN200 Light Equipment and Rigging

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students in attendance will be introduced to the basic methods and safety procedures of moving material and equipment on the job site. Students will also learn basic inspection techniques, knots, and load handling along with the American National Standards Institute hand signals. In addition, the students will operate a skid steer, three forklifts each with different capacities, rough terrain forklift (extend-a-boom forklift), and scissor lifts. The students will be given the chance to operate additional equipment if available.


CSTN211 Advanced Framing Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160, and CSTN161

Students will expand knowledge of floor, wall, and roof systems by studying and applying techniques reflecting new technologies in both residential and light commercial construction.


CSTN225 Decks and Patios

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Emphasis will be on designing and identifying the different types of decks and patios. It will introduce students to traditional and new deck materials, different concrete-stamping methods, and types of placers. Several basic fence styles will also be described.


CSTN230 Advanced Roof, Floor, Wall, and Stair Systems

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160 and CSTN161

Provides lab/site setting for application of building practices covered in third semester curriculum. Emphasis will be on advanced framing techniques for floor, wall, and roof systems. Building an onsite structure will also provide a setting for practical application of learning outcomes associated with CSTN200 and CSTN211.


CSTN235 Stationary Machines and Joinery

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces students to the use of stationary machines commonly used in a shop/lab setting. Emphasis will be on safety and general usages and applicable material processing and practices. The student should be able to name, recognize, and build the different components used in building a cabinet.


CSTN236 Advanced Stationary Machine and Joinery

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course covers the usage of a multi-pin borer, pocket cutters, European hinge cutter, and drill presses along with advanced dado blade techniques on the table saw. The student will be doing advanced material processing for the different components used in building a cabinet.


CSTN250 Construction Estimating

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160 and CSTN161

This class introduces the students to the basic concept of construction estimating for both residential and light commercial construction with emphasis on residential. Students will learn how to use a construction calculator to estimate site-development, concrete costs, and all building materials associated with a construction project.


CSTN260 Construction Concepts and Building Lab III

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN230

Advanced Structural Concepts and Building Lab IV provides the lab/field setting for the application of the building practices taught during the 4th semester classes. Primary emphasis will be on implementing the practices taught in CSTN171 and CSTN225. Other time may be spent onsite implementing live work components of some 3rd semester classes. The lab/shop settings as well as off-campus and on-campus projects may be used for guided practice, live work, and/or individual student assessment. Upon successful completion of CSTN260, students should be able to perform the student outcomes applicable to class safety, in a suitable time frame allowable in the construction industry.


CSTN270 Foundations of Construction Project Management

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces topics such as licensing, code jurisdictions, building inspection, record keeping, timelines, project development, ordering materials, supervision of construction, OSHA, employee rights, safety requirements, subcontractors, construction loans, punch lists, etc.


CSTN295 Practicum: Construction

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-year construction program courses

This class provides classroom and lab settings for the application of building practices not covered in the current 1st year’s curriculum. These modules were chosen because of current construction trends, advisor recommendations, and student requests. Topics covered in this year’s special topics class may include but are not limited to electrical, plumbing, metal stud construction, with a variety of different community based projects.


CSTN298 Construction Internship

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-year construction program courses

This course enhances classroom learning with a real-life work experience. The host contractor provides on-the-job training. The student intern will gain valuable work experience and interact with professional construction workers and management personnel.


CT161 Web Page Graphic Design

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in MART145

This course studies professional page layout and graphic design techniques for the Web. Students will learn to critique existing Web sites with an eye toward aesthetics and usability. Students will build effective site layouts based on visual design principles that enhance the site aesthetics. Through professional graphics tools, students will create Web graphics and animation. The impact of different design techniques on site accessibility will be discussed. Students will also learn to effectively use cascading style sheets (CCS) to stylize entire web sites.


CT230 Introduction to the Large Enterprise System I

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CAPP100 or placement; A “C-” or higher in CSCI100 or previous programming experience; A “C-” or higher in ITS280 or previous desktop computer administration experience; or consent of instructor

An introductory course designed to provide an overview of enterprise-based computer technology and computer information systems used in the workplace. Students gain an understanding of the reasons companies choose mainframe systems and are introduced to hardware systems architecture, batch processing software, and procedures. Explores integration and application in business and other segments in society. Students will be introduced to the z/OS operating system and the tools and utilities used when developing programs for the z/OS operating system. Topics covered include the mainframe in business today, including mainframe job roles; capacity, scalability, availability, systems management mainframe interfaces; Job Control Language; mainframe hardware and architecture; and application programming on the mainframe.


CT253 Developing Web Applications

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100, CSCI240, and MART145

This is an introductory course in ASP.NET using the C# programming language. It is imperative that business and government offer accessibility to their customers and clients through interactive web pages. In this course, students will develop a fully-functioning interactive website simulating an on-line business or government capability. Students will do their work using Microsoft Visual Studio and the Windows IIS web server.


CT262 Web Databases

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111, CSCI240, and MART145

The focus of this class will be on the development of web-based front-ends to databases. Oracle and open source tools will be used to implement web database applications in multi-tier environments. Students will learn Java Servlets, Java Server Pages (JSP), Spring MVC and an ORM framework.


DFT150 CAD 2D

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introduction to computer-aided design software using a 2D medium with emphasis on features, limitations, and considerations associated with the commands and characters.


DFT210 Technical Drafting I - CAD 2D

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Application of technical drafting technology using computer-aided drafting (CAD) as the medium. Auxiliary views, revolutions, dimensioning, tolerancing, fasteners, design, and working drawing shall be covered.


DFT225 Architectural Drafting I - CAD

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150 or consent of instructor

Application of construction architectural drawings using the power of CAD as the medium for drafting. This course utilizes working drawings to focus on scale to drawing parameters, symbol libraries, dimensioning, and drawing enhancement and also introduces CAD generated three-dimensional drawings.


DFT230 CAD 3D

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150 and DFT225 or consent of instructor

This course continues instruction of computer-aided design software and its application capabilities in the creation of advanced 3-D designs.


DST105 Shop Safety

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course will introduce students to the safety requirements and common shop practices of the diesel and heavy equipment industry. Personal safety as well as overall shop/job site safety will be emphasized while students learn to operate shop equipment, identify and assemble common components, and make repairs common to all aspects of the diesel and heavy equipment industry. Skills learned in this course will be directly applied throughout the diesel technician program. Students will receive instruction on the safe operation of a lift truck.


DST110 Diesel Electrical and Electronics I

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to give students basic electrical/electronic knowledge. The course progresses from electrical/electronic theory, circuits and circuit failure, and components of the starting and accessory systems. Emphasis will be placed on developing the knowledge base needed for diagnosing and repairing diesel equipment electrical systems.


DST111 Diesel Electrical and Electronics II

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110

This course is designed to give students basic electrical/electronic knowledge. The course is a continuation from Diesel Electrical and Electronics I. Emphasis will be placed on developing the knowledge base needed for charging systems, circuit diagnosing, diesel computer control systems, and repairing diesel equipment electrical systems. It is also designed to provide hands-on activities common to diesel equipment electrical and electronic applications.


DST130 Heating and Air Conditioning

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110 and DST111

This course is designed to provide Diesel Technology students with the knowledge and skills required to understand, service, and repair mobile air conditioning systems as used in the diesel industry. The course content includes heat and refrigeration principles as they relate to transport refrigeration. Component functions and EPA requirements are covered in this course.


DST142 Hydraulics

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110 and DST111

This is an introductory course that will cover the basic theory and understanding of hydraulic principles as related to many components and systems covered in the advanced courses in the Diesel Technology program. In addition to the basic theory, the function of basic systems and components will be discussed. Using school-owned hydraulic mock-ups, the students will disassemble, inspect, and reassemble hydraulic pumps, motors, cylinders, and electric and manual control valves. Students will learn how to read schematics and create a functioning hydraulic circuit.

DST145 Diesel Engine Repair

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110 and DST111

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to understand and repair various engine systems as used in the heavy-duty, diesel-powered, on-and-off-road equipment industry. Emphasis will be placed on pre-electronic diesel engines.


DST200 Diesel Engine Performance

Credits: 8
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110, DST111 and DST145

This is an advanced level course offered to second-year, Diesel Technology students. This course builds upon the knowledge and skills attained in the first-year courses DST110 and DST111 Electrical/Electronics, as well as DST145 Diesel Engine Repair, to solve diesel engine performance problems. Students will be exposed to maintenance, diagnostic, and repair experiences involving a variety of systems on diesel-powered equipment. The diesel engine systems included are starting, charging, accessory, lighting, instrumentation, as well as diesel engine mechanical fuel systems, electronic engine control, and tune-up.


DST210 Diesel Maintenance Practices

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110 and DST111

This is a preventative maintenance course for heavy-duty, diesel powered, on-and-off-road equipment. This course familiarizes the student with routine service, inspection, and adjustment of the following component/systems: engine, power train, hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical, steering, braking, cooling, and air intake systems. Lubricants, fuels, and filters will also be included. Students will also be exposed to annual Department of Transportation inspection of heavy-duty diesel trucks.


DST240 Heavy Duty Manual Drive Trains

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110 and DST111

This course includes the basic fundamentals of manual drive trains including power flow, ratios, gears, bearings, and seals. With removal, troubleshooting, repair, and replacement of clutches, transmissions, drive lines, drive axles, final drives, power takeoffs, and specialty drives that are related to heavy-duty, diesel powered, on-and-off-road equipment.


DST245 Heavy Duty Hydraulic Drive Trains

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110, DST111 and DST142

This course covers the fundamentals, operation, diagnosis, and repair of hydrostatic and power shift transmissions, torque converters and torque dividers that are related to the heavy duty, diesel powered, on and off road equipment.


DST255 Heavy Duty Brakes and Undercarriage

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DST110 and DST111

This course covers the adjustment, maintenance, troubleshooting, and repair of heavy-duty air-actuated brakes, dual air system valves and circuits, heavy-duty ABS systems, and hydraulic- assisted brakes as used with on-and-off-road diesel powered equipment. This course also includes maintenance, adjustment, and repair of suspension systems as used with tandem axle diesel trucks and off-road equipment. Students will be exposed to alignment of solid I-beam front axles and 5th wheels as related to heavy-duty trucks.


DST265 Applied Lab Experience

Credits: 8
Prerequisites: 2nd year standing or consent of instructor

This course builds upon the knowledge and skill attained in previous courses. It is intended to match students with live, practical lab experiences involving subject matter previously covered in other courses. When provided with diesel powered equipment in need of maintenance, service, inspection, or repair of any component or system that the student has had previous instruction while in the program, the student will interact with the customer/operator, generate the work order, and in a safe, efficient, and organized manner, set about to perform the proper operations needed to place equipment back into operation, and complete the documentation needed to close the work order. This will be accomplished to meet customer requests, industry standards, and instructor’s satisfactory critique of student performance and productivity with available resources.


DST292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


DST298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of the Division Chair

This course enhances classroom learning with a real life work experience. The host employer provides on-the-job training. The student intern will gain valuable work experience and interact with professional technicians and management personnel. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


ECNS201 Principles of Microeconomics

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

The course studies the market behavior of individuals, households, and businesses, focusing on how individual choice influences and is influenced by economic forces. Areas of study include individual decision-making, pricing, supply and demand functions of firms, market structures, impacts of the government sector, and impacts of distribution of income alternatives.


ECNS202 Principles of Macroeconomics

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

The course studies the market as a whole, focusing on aggregate relationships such as unemployment, inflation, and business cycles. Areas of study include aggregate supply and demand, fiscal policy, money and banking, monetary policy, economic growth, impacts of government budget and deficit financing, and consequences of international trade.


ECNS203 Principles of Micro and Macro Economics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the major principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. Topics covered include scarcity, resource utilization, utility, supply/demand, opportunity cost, production possibilities, curve/economic models, market structures, cost/profit, circular flow of money, GDP, unemployment, inflation, fiscal/monetary policy, and the relationship of current events to both micro and macroeconomic concepts.


ECP130 Emergency Medical Technician

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: Hepatitis B Vaccines, Tuberculosis test (current or within past six months) and Criminal Background Check

This course covers all emergency medical techniques currently considered to be within the responsibilities of the EMT-B providing emergency care with an ambulance service. The course involves classroom, in-hospital observation, and clinical experience. The purpose of the training is to ensure individual competency in each student by the successful completion of each objective.


EDU106 Foundations of E-Learning Instructional Engagement

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical foundations of e-learning. The student will explore the history, trends, current issues, best practices, and instructional technology of e-learning and learning theories. Through group and individual assignments, students will design and create basic instructional, educational, and business training environments by developing wireframe models. Students will develop the instructional models through the process of writing measurable learning objectives that align with assessments, integrating task analyses, and incorporating online learning communities promoting collaborative learning. A final project and presentation will include an extensive review and evaluation of the e-learning environment developed in class.


EDU108 Instructional Design I for E-Learning

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none
This introductory course will explore learning theories including behaviorist, cognitive, constructivist, and social learning by examining the relationship each has to instructional practices and course design. This course will introduce basic e-learning principles and vocabulary. The Instructional Design I course identifies factors for and suggests strategies to influence learner motivation, learner engagement, and learning styles. Students will begin to identify learning outcomes that can be addressed in an e-learning setting. A final project will include the development of an e-learning instructional unit using a learning management system (LMS) to incorporate the instructional design concepts.

EDU200 Introduction to Education

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or equivalent score on writing placement test

This course explores education in America from early childhood through high school graduation. This course will introduce the philosophical foundations, learning environments, social contexts, curriculum and instruction, standards and assessment, as well as contemporary issues related to the field. The roles, responsibilities, and daily life of teachers, schools, and students will be examined.


EDU202 Early Field Experience

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EDU200 and WRIT095 or equivalent score on writing placement test

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore education through field experience and teaching portfolio development. Students will begin building a teaching portfolio that will be used to provide them with authentic assessment information about how well they are progressing toward specific program goals in their efforts to become teachers. Students will complete 30 hours of field experience.


EDU208 Instructional Design II for E-Learning

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EDU108 or consent of instructor

Students will expand on a variety of instructional design philosophies and strategies used to develop instructional materials for the educational or workforce training environment. Students will conduct a needs assessment and use formative evaluations to identify instructional effectiveness of the learning material. This course, being the second course in the Instructional Design series, will expand upon e-learning environments, the role of learning management systems, online collaboration, synchronous communication, and asynchronous communication by using industry standard tools to create interactive learning experiences for students. A project and report/presentation are major products of this course.


EDU210 Learning Technologies for Organizations

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course explores the ways in which technology is reshaping how organizations work and how learning takes place. Students will examine these changes in the context of educational technology leadership and knowledge management in business, corporations, government/military agencies, associations, schools, and universities. In addition to providing an overview of how and why technology impacts workforce training, this course will discuss emerging technological roles and expectations. Students learn various project management concepts and processes that can be applied to projects in a real-world training environment. A final project will include the development of a case study on an e-learning project that requires assessment, design, development, project management, and evaluation associated with an organizational setting.


EDU258 Structured Analysis and Design in E-Learning

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EDU208 or consent of instructor

This course focuses on using a structured analysis and design approach to develop instructional resources. Students will learn basic instructional design development techniques, strategies of instruction, management of the online environment, and evaluation of the learning site based on best practices evaluation criteria. The hands-on component of this course includes defining system users, identifying considerations for improving communication among diverse stakeholders, developing and applying a needs assessment, defining instructional objectives, designing a the new system, and managing the site from a teacher/facilitator perspective. Within the design phase students will create exercises, assignments, and activities that can be used in online courses. In order to make more informed instructional decisions, students will incorporate the use of data analysis tools to develop strategies that improve the decision making process.


EDU260 Digital Media and Visual Literacies

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EDU208 or consent of instructor

This course investigates digital media literacy and its impact on the learning process. This course engages students by discussing the practice of communicating with visual resources. Additionally, this course places an emphasis on using visuals for communication in digital media environments as well as understanding the responsible use of digital media globally. Design of instructional video, audio, graphics, learning management systems, animation, presentation, and other personal learning networks for instantaneous and targeted professional development and communication are covered. Using a course template and working from online tutorials, students will create components of an online course, adding content from their discipline. Web related accessibility issues will be explored with an emphasis on providing students with the necessary design skills to develop online courses and course materials that are universally accessible.


ENSC105 Environmental Science

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to introduce students to important science-related issues in the world around us. The class will examine environmental issues on global, regional, and local scales. Class discussions and activities will emphasize the basic scientific principles needed to evaluate scientific problems relevant to environmental issues.


ENSC135 Topographic Maps and Aerial Photo Interpretation

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M121 or higher or consent of instructor

The course will introduce basic principles, techniques, processes, and procedures for quantitative and qualitative interpretation of topographic maps and aerial photographs. The course will entail not only formal explanation of principles and concepts, but also hands-on exercises that focus on various practical applications for effective interpretation of maps and air photos in order to make quality assessments of physical objects or locations of interest. Each student is required to conduct an individual research project, which will consist of problem solving using the analytical skills learned during the semester.


ENSC140 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CAPP131 or higher or consent of instructor

This course teaches the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the science and technology behind it. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of geography and spatial relationships and the concepts and tools used to create, maintain, and display GIS data. The course will consist of online lessons and readings each with approximately 2-4 hours of material..


ENSC150 Hydrologic Measurements

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ENSC272 and M121 or higher or consent of instructor

Increasing competition for water has led to the need for accurate water measurement in order to more efficiently manage the resource. This course is designed to teach the basics of surface and ground water measurement and provide a theoretical understanding of the science. Students will learn the most commonly used measurement and data collection techniques and how to properly analyze the data.


ENSC211 Environmental Policy and Laws

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ENSC105 or consent of instructor

This course is an introduction to the study of environmental politics, policy, and laws. It examines the development of environmental policy in the United States while exploring the opposing environmental relationships between science versus belief, rich versus poor, the powerful versus the disenfranchised, and idealism versus practice. Through analysis and case studies, this course provides an overview and assessment of key environmental policy issues, developmental framework of current laws, and their associated implications for environmental issues.


ENSC215 Ground Water Hydrology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EVSC150 and M121 or consent of instructor

Ground Water Hydrology presents fundamental concepts and principles of the geology of ground-water occurrence, aquifer types and their hydraulic properties, ground-water flow, well drilling and design technology, aquifer testing analysis methods, and interpretation and assessment of aquifer-testing results and pumping impacts.


ENSC220 Surface Water Hydrology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EVSC150 and M121 or consent of instructor

Surface Water Hydrology is designed to provide students with an understanding of basic surface water hydrology and hydrological processes, beginning with conceptual principles to quantitative and qualitative standards and methods. This course involves an in-depth analysis of the hydrologic cycle and principles including precipitation, evapotranspiration, stream flow, and open channel hydraulics, rainfall, interception, infiltration, and groundwater hydrology. This class will prepare students for careers emphasizing surface water resource management.


ENSC242 Environmental Sampling I

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EVSC215 and EVSC220 or consent of instructor

Environmental Sampling I expands on the fundamental knowledge taught in Hydrologic Measurements, Surface Water Hydrology, and Groundwater Hydrology. Using the skills and methods required for measuring and analyzing surface water and groundwater, students will make predictions or decisions in water resource applications. The course will emphasize the practical application of knowledge learned in previous courses.


ENSC245 Soils

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: CHMY 141/142 or higher or consent of instructor
Pre-requisites: A “C-” or higher in M121 or higher

This course discusses soils and their properties as components of landscapes and ecosystems. Students will understand the application of soils knowledge to problems in environmental sciences and management of agricultural, wild land, and urban landscapes.


ENSC270 Water Quality

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY121/122; ENSC272; M121; or consent of instructor

This water quality course provides an understanding and an awareness of the basic principles of water quality. Course content will include water quality parameters, pollution sources, and water treatment. This will be related to water regulations, requirements, policies, understanding the basics of a water quality plan both locally and regionally, and testing procedures. The water quality course is designed to prepare students for future careers in applied water resource management.


ENSC272 Water Resources

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course provides a basic introduction to the fundamental concepts, techniques, and knowledge required to understand and manage water resources. The course will provide an introduction to a variety of water resource topics, including: water resources terminology, the principles of the hydrologic cycle, water balance techniques, hydrology, hydrogeology, basic computational techniques, historic water information, water law, and water rights overview. Through the use of professional sources, the students will develop a working knowledge of the hydrologic, water quality, legal, economic, political, and social factors that determine water availability, hazards, use, demand, and allocation.


ENST230 Nature and Society

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 or WRIT121T

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between human society and the environment and how it has changed through the growth of modern civilization. The course applies the idea that true environmental studies are a mixture of multiple disciplines and not just a science topic. The course is presented to allow students flexibility to draw and present their own conclusions, similar to a philosophy course in the humanities. Students will read from multiple sources and class discussions will reflect topics of student interest and their applications to modern society.


EVSC233 Environment and the Economy

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This introductory course covers the economics of natural resources with an emphasis on economic tools used to analyze key economic aspects associated with water and natural resources. Topics covered include but are not limited to urban demand for water, water supply and economic growth, water benefit-cost analysis, water utility economics, irrigation demand, large water projects, economic impacts of surface water law and institutions, economics of salinity and drainage, and economics of groundwater management.


EVSC235 Soils, Weather, and Climate

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ENSC105 and ENSC272 or consent of instructor

This course provides an overview of regional hydrologic cycles in relationship to climatology, weather, and soils. An examination of soil profiles, classification of soils, and water movement in soils in association with an introduction to the water balance, and its relationship to components including evapotranspiration, interception, soil moisture storage, land usage, groundwater storage, and overland flow will be examined.


EVSC240 Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-“or higher in EVSC140 or consent of instructor

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used for the creation, storage, representation, research, and analysis of spatial information in a digital environment. This course expands on the fundamentals and principles of GIS and cartography learned in the Introduction to Geographic Information Systems course. Students will learn the processes, procedures, and the critical thinking involved with performing geospatial analysis. The course will entail a hands-on lab that focuses on GIS concepts and techniques utilized for data design, analysis, and map creation. Each student is required to conduct their own individual research project, which will consist of model building and design for spatial analysis.


EVSC260 Field Methods and Reporting

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EVSC215 and EVSC220 or consent of instructor

The Field Methods and Reporting course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the scientific principles and protocols used in water resource measurements and field methods. The course will emphasize equipment utilized in water resource measurements and experimental design for water resource studies. Measurement, sampling strategies, and safety practices in the field will be discussed along with field trips to demonstrate application of field methods.


FIRE101 Introduction to Fire Service

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course will introduce the student to the fire service and covers basic information needed to understand the fire protection career field. Basic terms, facts, and pieces of equipment used by the fire service will be shown and used during this course.


FIRE102 Fire Service 2

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: FIRE101 and FIRE103
Prerequisites: none

Fire Service 2 is a continuation of Introduction to the Fire Service. This course continues coverage of information to understand the fire protection career field. Terms, facts, and pieces of equipment used by the fire service will be utilized in preparation for Firefighter One Certification.


FIRE103 Fire Fighter Safety

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course will allow the student to learn the reasons for firefighter deaths and injuries. It is designed to allow the student to develop and use safe working practices in
firefighting. The course covers OSHA and NFPA standards relating to firefighter safety, types of protection equipment, and their use and care.


FIRE106 Wildland Fire Fighting

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the methods, equipment, and terminology specific to wildland firefighting. Students will learn the behavior of wildland fires and federal wildland firefighting procedures and references.


FIRE107 Personal Physical Fitness I

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

Emergency personnel must maintain healthy physical conditioning to handle the physical demands of responding to emergency incidents. Students in this course will learn effective workout habits and improve their own body conditioning.


FIRE108 Personal Physical Fitness II

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

Emergency personnel must maintain healthy physical conditioning to handle the physical demands of responding to emergency incidents. Students in this course will learn the importance of choosing and maintaining a career-long lifestyle that includes good nutrition and physical conditioning.


FIRE110 Hazardous Materials

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course covers a basic introduction to hazardous materials, their definition types, hazards, and characteristics. Students will be introduced to hazardous materials and the first responder’s responsibility when responding to a hazardous materials incident.


FIRE120 Emergency Services Customer Service

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course will familiarize the student with the techniques necessary to establish positive relationships with the community, the fire service, and all other groups that are called upon to mitigate the effects of emergency and disaster situations. The student will become familiar with basic emergency policies dealing with equal employment opportunities, discrimination, and harassment and will develop a professional self-image.


FIRE121 Incident Command

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

A firefighting team needs to know who is in charge and how to effectively respond to the incident commander. This course focuses on the vital importance of incident command and commonly accepted practices.


FIRE125 Emergency Equipment Maintenance

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course provides practical experience with the proper maintenance of all types of emergency equipment. The maintenance of firefighting and medical emergency equipment will be taught along with the basic maintenance of emergency vehicles.


FIRE130 Fire Apparatus Operation

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the major types of firefighting apparatus such as pumpers, aerial apparatus, aircraft crash vehicles, and other support vehicles. Students will be taught operation and operator maintenance of these specific vehicles.


FIRE140 Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategies

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Basic firefighting tactics and strategy used in all types of fire emergencies are taught in this course. Pre-planning, size-up, and applications of tactics based on the selected strategy are described and simulated for student learning.


FIRE202 Instructional Methodologies

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

Students will learn the basics of training other fire fighters at the company, battalion, or department level. Various methods of instruction, testing, and delivery will be discussed and practiced along with utilizing sources of instructional materials and the legal restrictions placed upon them.


FIRE210 Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting Basic Training (ARFF)

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Students must be physically able to secure SCBA’s, perform physically demanding tasks, and supply their own NFPA approved clothing.

This course is aimed at providing students with the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to effectively handle an aircraft emergency in accordance to FAR 139. It will contribute to the student’s knowledge of basic firefighting and rescue principles.


FIRE215 Fire Streams

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in FIRE130

A fire fighter must be capable of understanding and calculating water hydraulics and fire stream flows in order to perform basic fire suppression duties as a member of a team. This course emphasizes the importance of fire streams.


FIRE225 Fire Officer

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in FIRE120

The duties of a fire officer at the company level in the fire service are taught in this course. Students will gain valuable leadership experience while performing the roles and responsibilities of a fire officer.


FIRE232 Basic Wildland Supervision

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in FIRE106

Basic supervision of wildland firefighting crews and equipment is covered in this course, as well as intermediate fire behavior. Effective use of personnel and equipment as well as resource typing will be emphasized.


FIRE234 Fire Protection Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course covers fire and smoke behavior with emphasis placed on detection, suppression, and the methods of automatic and manual extinguishments. Detection and sprinkler systems will be discussed.


FIRE241 Fire Inspection

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This class focuses on codes, prevention, and inspections. It covers the basic information required to complete a basic fire inspection and serves as an introduction to the codes and regulations that apply to building inspection.


FIRE242 Rescue

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in FIRE101 and FIRE103

Basic rescue techniques, tools, and equipment are covered in this class. Students will participate in auto extrication and high-angle rescue techniques.


FIRE250 Fire Ground Operations

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in FIRE101, FIRE103, FIRE130, and FIRE242

Individuals working together as a functional company unit will prepare for and demonstrate to State Certifications. This class monitors the knowledge and physical ability to perform the tasks required by the certification process.


FIRE260 Fire Investigation

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Knowledge of fire behavior obtained through successful completion of first year Fire and Rescue program courses.

This course covers basic fire cause determination techniques. Students will learn to find the area of origin, how the fire started, and the basics of arson detection and prosecution.


FIRE261 Building Construction

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

Students will learn basic building construction techniques and types as they relate to fire fighter safety, fire behavior, and building behaviors when subjected to fire and other natural and human caused occurences.


FIRE270 Fire Prevention

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students are provided fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention. Topics include the organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use of fire codes, identification and correction of fire hazards, the relationship between fixed fire suppression systems, fire loss mitigation, fire inspections, and fire and life safety public education programs.


FIRE288 Capstone

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in FIRE101

This capstone course is designed to assist the firefighting student in synthesizing prior knowledge gained in the firefighting curriculum. It also provides the student information regarding the current status of firefighting. This course is also designed to meet specific learning needs of students in their final semester of course study. There is independent study projects focusing on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. Among the choices offered to the student, he or she may design projects within this course to target his or her own learning needs. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as a Faculty Sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing specific learning outcomes and an evaluation process for the projects. Final grading in the course also depends on the student successfully preparing a comprehensive report and presenting to the sponsoring organization and/or peers.


FIRE289 Fire Service Internship

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: EMT-B Registry, third-semester standing

The student will report for duty with a combat shift of firefighters in an approved uniform with proper personal protective equipment. The student will be assigned to a firefighter mentor who will demonstrate the duties of a firefighter during real working shifts. The student will participate in all activities that the firefighters would be expected to perform during normal working days including physical training, equipment inspections and maintenance, station cleanup, drills, training, fire inspections, and emergency response. The student will not be allowed to perform any offensive firefighting duties that would require entering an IDLH atmosphere. The student will not be allowed to drive the host fire department’s apparatus.


FRCH101 Elementary French I

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This introductory course prepares students for basic communication in French and presents fundamentals of the language holistically through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also explores cultural information.


FRCH102 Elementary French II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in FRCH101

This course continues and builds on basic communication in French and presents more in-depth aspects of the language holistically through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also explores cultural information.


GEN287 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


GEN288 Internship

Credits: 1-6
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed at least two semesters (30 credits) in General Education courses and/or be recommended by a faculty member in order to become eligible for a student intern position.

This course is designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform work outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. It is designed to be a highly rewarding workplace experience to give the student exposure to real workplace conditions, with the opportunity to enhance his or her résumé and to aid in the student’s transition from school to work.


GEO101 Introduction to Physical Geology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed as both a general interest and application-based course for understanding natural processes that affect the earth’s surface. Topics include geologic history, mountain building, formation of the continents, earthquakes, weathering and erosion, rock and mineral identification, and physical and chemical aspects. It serves as an entry-level geology course for those who wish to pursue geology professionally or as a terminal course for those who wish to have a general knowledge of geologic principles.


GEO102 Introduction to Physical Geology Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This is the lab component for Introduction to Physical Geology.


GEO211 Earth History and Evolution

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in GEO101 or consent of instructor

Earth History and Evolution traces the history of the Earth since its inception 4.5 billion years ago. This course present scientific theories for the origin of the earth and the nature of important earth-shaping events in the past, including the development of the oceans, atmosphere, and climate.


GEO231 Geosciences Field Methods

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in GEO101 and GEO102; or GPHY111

This course introduces students to a variety of field methodologies routinely used in the collection, processing, and interpretation of scientific data.


GEO299 Geotech Capstone Project

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: GEO231 (Optional)
Prerequisites: none

Students will complete a project in conjunction with GEO231 or as a separate assignment during the final semester of the program. This capstone course will provide the opportunity for the student to demonstrate that they have learned the material from the program and can apply it in the real world. It provides the student with the opportunity to develop a plan to solve a problem dealing with a geoscience issue.


GPHY111 Physical Geography and Lab

Credits: 4
Co-requisites: M090 or above
Prerequisites: none

This lecture and lab course serves as an introduction to the manner in which natural systems function at global and regional scales. The lecture part of the course uses a geographical perspective to analyze landforms, climate, the water cycle, and the biosphere; examining spatial relationships and regional variations; and addressing spatial patterns of human activity as related to environmental phenomenon. The lab component of the course introduces the students to concepts and techniques needed to understand and analyze the information contained in the course as well as exercises on various types of maps, graphs, aerial photos, imagery, and other graphics and geographic data sets.


GPHY262 Spatial Sciences Technology and Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in EVSC140

This course addresses the fundamentals of GPS, GIS, and remote sensing, and their application in a wide range of disciplines. Students will gain hands-on experience with GPS, GIS, and remote sensing software.


HONR121 Ways of Knowing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT101

Using a diverse selection of readings representing more than three thousand years of history and numerous cultures, we will explore various ways of knowing, including rational/quantitative, relational/sympathetic, sensory/empirical, and narrative/mythological ways of knowing. In the process we will become acquainted with some of the great ideas about the divine, the natural world, and the self in solitude and society. We will be alert for cracks in our apparent certainties and consolations in the midst of our doubts. As we look into our texts, we will also consider the ethical implications that flow from their various perspectives. Informed by class readings, plenary lectures, and discussions, students will work toward a deeper understanding of their own ways of knowing.


HR100T Human Relations

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

Students will survey the human components of successful working environments with an emphasis on awareness of human/workplace needs, self-awareness, and responsibility to relationships in the workplace.


HR101 College Success

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is meant to enhance the students’ analytic thinking and critical reading skills and introduce students to available academic and campus resources. Students will learn various Insitutional procedures and be introduced to the scholarly life of a college student, study topics and experiences designed to support their academic success and foster personal growth, explore and identify a variety of learning styles and develop financial literacy skills. This course will help students gain ownership of their educational experience and also become an integral part of the Helena College community.


HR110T Career Development and Human Relations

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course serves as an introduction to the working environment, emphasizing self-awareness and responsibility to relationships, as well as the written and oral interactions necessary to gain employment: resumes, cover letters, applications, and interviews. It is recommended for students in their third or fourth semester.


HSTA101 American History I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

A survey of the political, constitutional and diplomatic history, economic history, and social, intellectual and cultural history of the United States from the first settlement to the Civil War. Emphasizes a substantive understanding of the events, trends, and personalities of U.S. history and the development of skills in analysis and communication.


HSTA102 American History II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

A survey of the political, constitutional and diplomatic history, economic history, and social, intellectual, and cultural history of the United States from the Civil War to the present day. Emphasizes a substantive understanding of the events, trends, and personalities of U.S. history and the development of skills in analysis and communication.


HSTA160 Introduction to the American West

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: none

A survey of the social, economic, political, and environmental history of the United States west of the Mississippi River from prehistory to the Second World War. This course emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of the events, trends, and personalities that characterized the American West and its impact on U.S. History.


HSTA215 Post-WW II America

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

A comprehensive overview of United States history from 1945 to the beginning of the Reagan Era in 1980, this course includes reading, lecture/discussions, and audio-visual materials that address key issues that faced the United States in the wake of World War II. Topics include the Cold War and nuclear weapons, Nixon, the civil rights movement, the Korean and Vietnam wars, popular culture, the Baby Boom, television, and the space program.


HSTA255 Montana History

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course offers a comprehensive study of the social, economic, cultural, and political development of Montana, with an emphasis on critical reading, interpretation, research, and written analysis.


IDSN101 Introduction to Interior Design

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Design fundamentals as related to the study and practice of Interior Design. Students will be introduced to the career of interior design, the design process, elements and principles of design, and design concept. Other topics include materials, lighting, human factors, and space planning, environmental design, and health and safety design issues. Course will include lectures, media presentations, and class discussions.


IDSN110 History of Interior Design I Ancient - 1900

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Course surveys the historical relationship between Western interior architecture, furniture, and decorative arts from antiquity to the 19th century. Style development will be emphasized as it relates to people, social conditions, and political context. Lecture format with media presentations.


IDSN111 History of Interior Design II 1900 - Contemporary

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Course surveys the interiors, furniture, and the decorative arts from the Victorian period to the present. Style development will be emphasized as it relates to people, social conditions, political context, and technology. Lecture format with media presentations.


IDSN120 Materials and the Environment

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: IDSN101
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in IDSN101

This course introduces textiles and various interior materials and sources that would be selected, specified, installed, and maintained in an interior environment. In this course, studies will include research and application of environmentally green products. Students will research the “green” appropriateness of textiles, materials for flooring, walls, ceilings, upholstery, millwork, and cabinetry. The course introduces equipment, appliances, and how to measure, specify, and understand correct installation methods and product maintenance.


IDSN125 Lighting the Environment

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150 and IDSN101

This course introduces lighting design for interior environments. Students explore human visual perception, properties of natural and artificial light, lighting devices and controls, and visual communication of lighting designs. Discussion regarding energy issues and selection of green products is throughout the course. The course includes application to specific design problems.


IDSN135 Fundamentals of Space Planning

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: IDSN101
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in IDSN101
Students will learn how to plan spaces with graphic tools and techniques to communicate space planning and conceptual design through two-dimensional drawings, schematics, and three-dimensional models. This course introduces fundamental theories and processes for the organization and arrangement of spaces in the interior environment. Students will learn to examine space in terms of human behavior, their activities, and their built environment.


IDSN198 Residential Studio Internship

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: IDSN240
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ARTZ105; DFT150; IDSN101, and IDSN135

This course is for students who wish to only complete the one-year certificate. Students will observe professional design environments to develop an awareness of the responsibility to relationships in the workplace. Students will complete a thirty hour internship.


IDSN230 Interior Architectural CAD

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150

This course is the application of construction architectural drawings using the power of CAD as the medium for drafting. This course utilizes working drawings to focus on scale-to-drawing parameters, symbol libraries, dimensioning, and drawing enhancement and also introduces CAD generated three-dimensional drawings.


IDSN240 Studio I - Residential

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150; IDSN101 and IDSN135

Students apply the problem-solving discipline of the design process and its application to residential design. Students develop concepts to achieve design goals and apply technical skills to their design solutions as they work on a variety of relevant interior design projects. Students apply the problem-solving discipline of the design process and its application to residential design. Students develop concepts to achieve design goals and apply technical skills to their design solutions as they work on a variety of relevant interior design projects. This course focuses on environmental “green” interior materials and products that would be selected and specified in residential spaces. (Studio format with 5 hours contact)


IDSN250 Studio II - Commercial

Credits: 4
Co-requisites: IDSN230 and IDSN240
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150 and IDSN240

Students apply the problem-solving discipline of the design process and its application to public design. Students develop concepts to achieve design goals and apply technical skills to their design solutions as they work on a variety of relevant interior design projects, which could include office, medical, and/or retail environments. This course focuses on environmental “green” interior materials and products that would be selected and specified in public studio. In this course, students will learn codes, regulations, and laws as they relate to public interiors. (Studio format with 6 hours of contact)


IDSN252 Studio III - Corporate

Credits: 4
Co-requisites: IDSN120
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in IDSN120, IDSN230, IDSN240 and IDSN250

Students apply the problem-solving discipline of the design process and its application to corporate design. Students develop concepts to achieve design goals and apply technical skills to their design solutions as they work on a variety of office spaces. A portion of this course focuses on environmental “green” interior materials and products that would be selected and specified in a corporate studio. In this course, students will learn codes, regulations, and laws as they relate to office interiors. Students will develop appropriate working drawings for an office space. (Studio format with 6 hours of contact)


IDSN255 Environmental Design Studio

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in IDSN230 and IDSN252

Students apply the problem-solving discipline of the design process and its application to design. Students develop concepts to achieve design goals and apply technical skills to their design solutions as they work on a variety of office spaces. This course focuses on environmental “green” interior materials and products that would be selected and specified in various interior spaces. In this course, students will learn to design with materials and methods that support green building concepts. (Studio format with 6 hours of contact)


IDSN275 Professional Practices

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in DFT150; IDSN101, IDSN120, IDSN125, IDSN135, IDSN230, IDSN240 and IDSN250

Students will learn the concept of the business and professional management of an interior design practice. Topics include resume writing, marketing skills, and creation of a portfolio. Students learn about working with showrooms, personnel in a design firm, and clients. Lecture format.


IDSN291 Special Topic: Study Abroad / Design, Art, and Archtecture

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This special topic course allows in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior space planning and design curriculum. ISDN291 emphasizes simple techniques and skills related to sketching quickly in a loose, conceptual format to communicate ideas.


IDSN298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in DFT150; IDSN101, IDSN120, IDSN125, IDSN135, IDSN230, IDSN240 and IDSN250
Provides “real-life” experience in an approved design firm where students are able to apply knowledge and skills learned in their courses. Students work in settings relevant to their future employment plans. Course includes directed learning and required internship hours.


IT120 Power Fundamentals

Credits: 3
Prerequisites:
none
Power fundamentals provides students a broad introduction to historical development and contemporary use of energy. Areas of interest include simple machines, conversion of work to energy, basic electrical concepts and two and four stroke engine theory. Power fundamentals is an activity centered course with the majority of lab and practical focus on small engines. Emphasis will be on the four major theories of small engines: compression, ignition, carburetion and governing.


IT220 Applied Electricity

Credits: 2
Prerequisites:
none
Students learn the principles of electricity including energy; power; Ohm’s and Watt’s law; series, parallel and combination circuits, direct and alternating current. The course is delivered in a lab-based setting and is intended for introductory level students. Successful students will learn basic terminology as well as the use of electricity to safely solve problems. Residential wiring and circuitry are a point of emphasis.


IT240 Basic Woodworking and Stationary Machines

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces students to the fundamental use of stationary machines commonly used in the shop/lab setting. Emphasis will be on safety and general usages and applicable material processing and practices. Students will have opportunity for skill development as well as acquisition of techniques and processes for operating stationary machines.


IT246 Advanced Woodworking and Stationary Machines

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN235 or ITS240

This course enhances students’ use of stationary machines commonly used in a shop, lab setting. Emphasis will be on safety and general usages and applicable material processing and practices. The student should be able to name, recognize, and build the different components used in cabinet construction. Students will be introduced to the usage of a multi-pin borer, stationary and portable pocket cutters, European hinge cutter as well as advanced table saw techniques and joinery practices. Students are expected to design, draw and build a personal wood project as an assessment of personal skill development in advanced woodworking.


IT270 Tool Sharpening, Maintenance, and Lab Management

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

This course enhances student awareness of management concepts and techniques in a shop and/or lab setting. Students will study tool and material storage arrangement, as well as floor plans and stationary tool placement. Emphasis will be on safety and general usages and applicable material processing and practices with regard to flow and productivity process. Special emphasis will be given to planning for optimum teaching/learning process in the lab environment. Students will perform equipment maintenance and repair. Students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to acquire skills in sharpening of hand tools as well as power tool blades and knives through hands on learning experiences.


ITS164 Networking Fundamentals

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: none

This course is an introduction to networking fundamentals with both lecture and hands-on activities. Topics include the OSI model and industry standards, network topologies, IP addressing (including subnet masks), and basic network design. Concepts are reinforced with lab activities using equipment in live and simulated environments.


ITS212 Network Operating System - Server Admin

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: ITS280

Students will install and use their own Windows 2008 Servers to explore server-based operating systems administration techniques. Emphasis will be on security, Active Directory structure, user administration, performance, resource sharing, and network access.


ITS218 Network Security

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ITS224, ITS280 and ITS164 or NTS104

This course focuses on network design as it relates to network security. Network architecture, security, network administration, documentation, and other networking topics pertinent to today’s network administrator are included in this course.


ITS224 Introduction to Linux

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100 and ITS280

Students are introduced to accessing a multi-user system. They learn to manage files and directories in a shared environment. Topics include simple user administration, scripts, and network access.


ITS255 IP Telephony

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in NTS105

A fundamental course helping students add to their data networking skills and gain essential Voice over IP (VoIP) knowledge, learn how VoIP works, why VoIP works, and how to implement VoIP as part of a converged network. Technical terminology, concepts, and non-CISCO devices are covered to broaden the students’ knowledge base. The lecture portion of the class uses technical jargon and detailed presentations to illustrate the subject matter. Products such as Wireshark, trixbox (formerly Asterisk@Home), Linksys Ethernet phone, SIP-based ATA, SIP-based Server, and PBX products from Brekeke Software, Inc. are reviewed and discussed in light of their contributions to the industry. The hands-on labs reinforce lecture content. Students set up, configure and troubleshoot IP networks using CISCO routers, switches, and IP telephone equipment as well as CISCO Call Manager Express software. CISCO IOS commands learned in NTS104, NTS105, and NTS204 are used and expanded to router and switch configuration.


ITS280 Computer Repair and Maintenance

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This course is an in-depth exposure to computer hardware and operating systems with an eye toward the CompTIA A+ certification exam. Students learn functionality of hardware, computer maintenance, and safety. Hardware/software component interaction, customer service and networking concepts are discussed and explored with hands-on lab assignments. Students will gain confidence with the components of personal computer systems by learning proper procedures for hardware and software installations, upgrades, and troubleshooting.


LIT110 Introduction to Literature

Credits: 3
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.
Instruction in critical analysis of imaginative literature - fiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasis is on articulating strong responses to varied texts.


LIT212 American Literature Survey

Credits: 3 Offered Spring Semester
A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

An introduction to American cultural traditions through readings and discussions of representative texts from the Colonial Period to the present. This course presents the richness of American literature - its thematic and stylistic range and its geographical and ethnic diversity.


LIT213 Montana Literature

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

The course will survey representative writings from modern-day Montana writers. Students will analyze a variety of prose genera and appreciate the different styles, messages, and cultures presented in the works. Emphasis will be placed on themes and their reflection of Montana, the West, and all people, all places, all times.


LIT223 British Literature I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

In this survey of representative texts from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Enlightenment, students will explore a range of approaches to the development of British literature.


LIT224 British Literature II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

In this survey of representative texts from Romanticism to postmodernism, students will explore a range of approaches to the development of British literature and cultural identity.


LIT227 Introduction to Shakespeare

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

This course introduces students to the drama of Shakespeare. Students will use critical approaches to read and to analyze representative plays from the tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances.


LIT228 Introduction to Irish Literature

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester - Even Numbered Years
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

Students will survey Irish literature in English ranging from the mythological to the modern. The course will explore how a literature with a long history evolves and how it defines and expresses a cultural identity. Texts will include fiction, poetry, plays, videos, and prose.


LIT230 World Literature Survey

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

World Literature is a survey course of poetry, drama, short stories, and novels in translation that focuses on critical interpretation of the works individually and collectively. Students will explore literary themes, structures, and critical strategies.


LIT250 The Novel

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.
The course introduces critical analysis of the novel, with an emphasis on articulating strong responses to varied texts.


LIT291 Special Topics Variable

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory score on placement test. A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 is recommended.

This is an omnibus course, in which students will analyze and interpret selected literature, usually from a specific genre, period, or of a particular author or defined group of authors, depending upon the specific course offering. Specific course offerings may be experimental, intended as one-time only, or intended as part of a catalog of offerings that may be offered or rotated on a periodic basis.


M065 Pre-Algebra

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

A review of basic math skills to prepare for M090, M108 or M111. This course focuses on addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of decimals, fractions, and integers; order of operations; ratios; proportions and percentages; solving single variable linear equations; and the Cartesian Coordinate System.


M066 Pre-Algebra Lab

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: M065
Prerequisites: none

Students enrolled in M065 co-enroll in this course for additional instruction for M065 curriculum. This course focuses on addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals, fractions, and integers; order of operations; ratios, proportions, and percentages; solving single variable linear equations; and the Cartesian Coordinate System. Course is offered pass/fail.


M080 Pre and Introductory Algebra

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: none

This course serves as a review of basic math skills and as an introduction to algebra. The course focuses on addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and integers; order of operations; ratios, proportions, and percentages; the study of algebraic expressions, linear equations, linear inequalities, exponents, radicals, polynomials, quadratic equations, and graphs of linear equations and inequalities.


M090 Introductory Algebra

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course serves as an introduction to algebra which includes the study of real numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities, exponents, polynomials, quadratic equations, and graphs of linear equations and inequalities.


M095 Intermediate Algebra

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M080 or M090 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course studies systems of linear equations, absolute value equations and inequalities; functions, quadratic equations and their graphs; rational expressions and equations; radical expressions and equations; rational exponents and complex numbers.


M100T Introduction to Technical Mathematics

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This course reviews basic math skills commonly used in the technical occupations, including fractions, decimals, ratios, and formulas specific to the students’ trade areas. Required in some certificate programs and for students whose placement scores indicate a need for preparatory work in mathematics.

M108T Business Mathematics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students in this course will examine the mathematics of business ownership and demonstrate an understanding of business decisions. Topics include ratios and percentages, algebraic equations, marketing, payroll, cash flow, simple and compound interest, insurance, financial statements, depreciation, annuities, and inventory valuation.


M111T Technical Mathematics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

The course includes fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, formulas, and word problems. Topics studied are metric and standard American measurement systems, linear equations, developing applied skills in practical geometry, solid figures, and basic trigonometry.


M115 Probability and Linear Mathematics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites:A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course is intended to give an overview of topics in finite mathematics together with their applications. Topics covered include linear equations and functions; systems of linear equations and matrices; sets and counting; probability and statistics; and finance.


M121 College Algebra

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course is the study polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; circular equations; and systems of linear and non-linear equations and inequalities.


M145 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course is designed to meet the general education mathematics requirement for the liberal arts major. It surveys some of the important ideas and practical applications in mathematics and uses algebra skills to solve real problems. Topics include problem solving, financial math, mathematical modeling (linear and quadratic), and elementary statistics.


M151 Pre-Calculus

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M121 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course is primarily for students who intend to take calculus. Topics include problem solving with two and three dimensional geometry, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, trigonometric identities and equations, vectors and polar coordinates, extended use of magnitude, circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and sequences and series.


M171 Calculus I

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M151 or satisfactory score on placement test

The subject of this course is single variable calculus. Topics include functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, tangents, implicit differentiation, Mean Value Theorem, integration, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, logarithmic, exponential functions, and applications of integration.


M172 Calculus II

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M171 or satisfactory score on placement test

Topics include transcendental functions, applications of integration, techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series and convergence test, Power series, Taylor’s theorem, polar coordinates, and parametric equations.


MART145 Web Design

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students will create complex web pages using a text editor and professional development tools. Students will learn the basic elements of HyperText Markup Language (HTML), Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and JavaScript.


MCH120 Blueprint Reading and Interpretation for the Machinist

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH130

Blueprint reading covers orthographic projection, line identification, auxiliary and sectional views, dimensioning of drawings, common abbreviations, tolerancing, and sketching techniques.


MCH130 Machine Shop

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course includes an emphasis on shop and work area safety. Instruction covers standard shop work, such as measurement, layout, basic hand tools, drills, drill presses, and taps and dies. Use of pedestal grinder will be covered. Work assignments incorporate projects requiring use of the above machines, tooling, and emphasizes safety.


MCH132 Introduction to Engine Lathes

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: none

This course covers tool bit grinding, facing, turning, boring, parting off, threading, tapering, knurling, trepanning, between center work, and use of faceplates and steady rests. Engine lathe safety will also be covered. Use and care of precision measuring tools will be covered.


MCH134 Introduction to Mills

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH130

The course covers all types of vertical and horizontal milling machines and use of all related mill accessories. Work assignments incorporate projects requiring use of these machines and tooling.


MCH136 Advanced Lathes

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: none

The Advanced Lathe course will use engine lathes to manufacture industrial parts. The use of assorted cutting tools and support tooling, such as form tools, carbide inserts, taper attachments, follower, and steady rests. Close tolerance machining required. Actual customer projects will be incorporated into the course work. Safety concerns for both machines will be reviewed.


MCH137 Advanced Mills

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: none

The Advanced Mills course will utilize the horizontal and vertical mills in the lab. The use and care of rotary tables, indexing heads, end mills, slab mills, gear cutters, carbide cutters, criterion, and line boring will be covered. The various work holding methods, location methods, process planning and operations will be discussed. Safety concerns for both machines will be reviewed. Actual customer projects will be incorporated into the course work.


MCH139 Grinding Applications

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

The course covers setup, use, and safety requirements of grinding machines. Hands-on use of machines will be emphasized.


MCH200 Fundamentals of Machining

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students in this course will be introduced to machining principles and metal production systems used for the metals fabrication industry. Students will fabricate projects using the engine lathe, vertical milling machine, drill press, as well as other metal working, machinery and devices. Skills using micrometers, dial indicators, and dial calipers will be developed.


MCH230 Tooling and Fixtures Used in CNC

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

Tooling and fixtures used in CNC are discussed in a classroom environment. These topics, for both mill and lathe, will be discussed in order to facilitate the students’ ability to select proper work holding devices and cutting tools for various types of machining operations that may be performed. Cutting tool information is one of the most multifaceted areas of study for developing machinists and programmers. Both must be able to discern proper set-ups based on part and tool geometry while providing proper speed and feed data. The use of formulas and reference materials will be studied as a necessary facet of the manufacturing process.


MCH231 CNC Turning Operations Level 1

Credits: 4
Co-requistes: MCH230
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH136

This course is an introduction to CNC Turning Centers and the safe operation of common operating procedures, set-up and maintenance of the machine and control panel which will be discussed and implemented. The student will become acquainted with the ways in which various companies utilize CNC machine tools while learning methods for the installation of tools and establishing and utilizing fixture, tool and wear offsets. The students will also be introduced to the methods and reasons behind the modification of these reference offsets and other geometry offsets used to machine parts to demanding geometric tolerances.


MCH232 CNC Turning Programming Operations 2

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH231

This class introduces students to word address programming (G and M code) for CNC Turning Centers. The student will write formatted programs, set-up, and run their programs on the CNC Turning Center. Students will use basic and intermediate “G” codes with coordinates to create common part features such as contours, shoulders, bores, grooves, and chamfers. Students will learn to apply geometry offsets for machining their parts to exacting geometric tolerances. The goal will be to prepare, plan, then write safe, effective, and efficient CNC programs. Students will then use key concepts for part set-up, program verification, editing, and documentation.


MCH233 CNC Turning Programming Operations 3

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH231 and MCH232

This class enhances a student’s ability to program, set up, verify and operate CNC Turning Centers. The student will write well formatted CNC programs, utilizing strategic programming and logic techniques and CAD / CAM generated files, then set-up and run their programs on various CNC Turning Machines. Students will use “canned cycles” and intermediate level “G and M” codes to create common part features such as contours, grooves, bores, holes and threads, with an emphasis placed on Internal Diameter (ID) operations. The goal will be to prepare, plan manufacturing process, then write safe, effective, and efficient CNC programs. Students will then use key concepts for part set up, program verification, editing, and documentation of process.


MCH234 CNC Milling Operations Level 1

Credits: 4
Co-requisites: MCH230
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH137

This course is an introduction to CNC Milling Centers. The common operating procedures, set-up and maintenance of the machine and control panel will be discussed and implemented. The student will become acquainted with the ways in which various companies utilize CNC machine tools while learning methods for the installation of tools and establishing and utilizing fixture, tool and wear offsets. The students will also be introduced to the methods and reasons behind the modification of these reference offsets and other geometry offsets used to machine parts to demanding geometric tolerances.


MCH235 CNC Milling Programming Operations 2

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH234

This class continues the use of word address programming (G and M code) for CNC Machining Centers. The student will write formatted programs, set-up, and run their programs on the CNC Machining Center. Students will use basic and intermediate “G” codes with coordinates to create common part features such as contours, slots, bores, holes, and pockets. Students will prepare, plan, then write safe, effective, and efficient CNC programs. Students will then use key concepts for part set-up, program verification, editing, and documentation.


MCH236 CNC Milling Programming Operations 3

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Completion of 1st Year

Common uses of the CNC Machining Center are discussed and implemented. Canned cycles for pocketing, hole manufacturing, threading, cutter compensation, and other standard controller features will be utilized. Students will learn to use loops, multiple work offset programming techniques, subroutines, and subprograms to shorten and simplify programs. All these programming approaches will be performed on 3 axis and 4 axis machining centers. Students will also learn advanced techniques for making programs run more efficiently.


MCH237 CAD/CAM CNC Turning Center

Credits: 5
Co-requisites: MCH233
Prerequisites: Completion of 1st Year

This class introduces students to Mastercam X7 for Lathe/ Turning application. Students will learn to navigate the program’s GUI interface for the purpose of 1) creating part geometry as CAD entities; 2) defining cutting tools and machining operations; 3) generating CAM type tool paths; 4) graphically render their machining operations for verification purposes; and 5) post process their work. Students will then have the opportunity to load their programs into a CNC Turning Center and perform all necessary tasks to complete the manufacturing process for their piece part. This class will walk a student through the entire creative process of part design, manufacturing process development, and machining a finished product.


MCH238 CAD/CAM CNC Machining Center

Credits: 5
Co-requisites: MCH236
Prerequisites: Completion of 1st Year
This class introduces students to Mastercam X for CNC Milling application. Students will learn to navigate the program’s GUI interface for the purpose of 1) creating part geometry as CAD entities; 2) defining cutting tools and machining operations; 3) Generating CAM type tool paths; 4) graphically rendering their machining operations for verification purposes; and 5) post processing their work. Students will then have the opportunity to load their programs into a CNC Milling Center and perform all necessary tasks to complete the manufacturing process for their piece part. This class will walk a student through the entire creative process of part design, manufacturing process development, and machining a finished product.


MCH240 Metallurgy

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH130

The student will learn about types of ferrous and nonferrous metals and their applications. Metal numbering systems and the types of heat-treating will also be covered.


MCH245 Shop Practices

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH120, MCH130, MCH132, and MCH134

This is an ongoing semester course during normally scheduled shop hours. It is intended to match spring semester students with live, practical shop experiences involving subject matter previously covered in other courses. Emphasis will be on productivity.


Computer Aided Manufacturing-Metals

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in MCH200

This course covers the use of CAD/CAM/CNC machining to manufacture various metal products. Both Computer Numerical Control (CNC) of lathes and mills will be taught. Students will have opportunities to machine a wide variety of materials and gain other practice in Cad/Cam operations.


MECH205 Small Engines

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course concentrates on small gasoline engines as used in the Outdoor Power Equipment industry (less than 20 horse power). Emphasis will be on the four major theories of small engines-compression, ignition, carburetion, and governing. Students will disassemble, familiarize, inspect, reassemble, and operate a school-owned small engine.


MUSI101 Enjoyment of Music

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course traces the development of art music through the past 1000 years. Vocal and instrumental music and composers from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th century will be examined through listening, reading, and writing. Students will be presented with the analytical and comparative tools to identify and understand the various historical musical eras.


NASX105 Introduction to Native American Studies

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course is a study of the cultural makeup of Native Americans in Montana and subsequently in the United States. Education, historical, legal, and social aspects will be analyzed for their influence on the modern Indian culture.


NTS104 CCNA 1: Introduction to Networks

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This course is a fundamentals class based on the CISCO Network Academy curriculum. It is the first in a four-course series. This class covers: Network architecture, structure, functions, components and models of the internet and computer networks. Prionciples of IP addressing (IPv4 & IPv6), fundamentals of Ethernet and network media. Basic operation and configuration of network routers and switches. Basic principles are reinforced with hands-on and simulation lab work.


NTS105 CCNA 2: Routing and Switching

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in NTS104

Routing & Switching Essentials is the second of four courses in the Cisco Routing and Switching curriculum. This course will build on IOS commands learned in NTS-104. The course will cover routing and switching theory and device configuration. Routuing protocols: RIP1 & 2, OSPFv2 & v3. Switch port security, VLANS, trunking and interVlan routing. Communication protocols will be explored with hands-on lab models to reinforce the lecture concepts. Both live and simulation work allow students the freedom to learn - by - doing.


NTS204 CCNA 3: Scaling Networks

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ITS152

Advanced switching and routing is the focus of the third course in the CCNA curriculum. The course explores the role of switches in large and complex networks. VLANS, EtherChannerl, Spanning Tree protocol in various forms and Virtual Trunking Protocols are explored in-depth. Advanced routing protocols, OSPF and EIGRP implemented with IPv4 and IPv6 in single and multi-area are also a focal point of this course. Students build on skills and apply information from NTS104 and NTS105. Material is presented with both lecture and hands-on activities, using live and simulation work. Distance learning technologies allow students the freedom to learn-by-doing on Helena College’s extensive equipment inventory from home via internet connections to classroom hardware. Allowing student to practice network device configuration and troubleshooting much as they would in a “real world” environment.


NTS205 CCNA 4: Connecting Networks

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in NTS105

Connecting Networks is the fourth course in the CISCO series leading to the Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) exam. NTS204 and NTS205 may be completed in any order after completing the prerequisite. The curriculum focuses on Layer 2 WAN protocols, PPP and Frame-Relay, Network Address Translation, Port Address Translation, Virtual Private Network technologies and planning, VPN Tunning and implementing IPSec. Distance learning technologies are used to enable the students to access the equipment from home or other Helena College classroom computers.


NRSG100 Introduction to Nursing

Credits: 1; 1 Lecture
Prerequisites: none

The intent of this course is to socialize the participant to the roles/functions/expectations of the nurse. This course provides an introduction to nursing history and current views of nursing as a discipline (including various types of nursing occupations and educational requirements). Scholastic expectations required to complete a program of study in nursing are introduced as well as professional expectations of the practicing nurse. The following core concepts related to nursing practice are presented: the caring nature of the nursing profession; the importance of critical thinking/clinical judgment; legal/ethical/cultural issues in nursing; the need to understand human motivation and behavior; and use of the nursing process. Communication in various forms is emphasized.


NRSG130 Fundamentals of Nursing

Credits: 4; 4 Lecture
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

This course introduces learners to the clinical skills essential for the nursing role. It also includes complex concepts and behaviors of nursing roles within the context of the nursing process, holistic care, and health care. The course emphasizes the theoretical and practical concepts of nursing skills required to meet the needs of clients in a variety of settings.


NRSG131 Fundamentals of Nursing Lab

Credits: 3; 3 (90 hrs) Lab
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

This course introduces learners to the clinical skills essential for the nursing role. It also includes complex concepts and behaviors of nursing roles within the context of the nursing process, holistic care, and health care. Emphasis will be on the theoretical and practical concepts of nursing skills required to meet the needs of clients in a variety of settings.


NRSG135 Nursing Pharmacology

Credits: 3; 3 Lecture
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

Through caring, communication, professionalism, critical thinking, and critical judgment, students learn a structured systematic approach to the study of drug therapy. Medications are studied according to drug classes and therapeutic families. Students will learn to apply the nursing process to drug therapy with an emphasis on accessing relevant information to ensure client safety.


NRSG138 Gerontology for Nursing

Credits: 2; 1 Lecture, 1 (45 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

This course introduces the student to the skills and knowledge needed to provide nursing care to aging clients. Topics explored include current trends (including legal and ethical issues) in gerontological nursing; developing stages and transitions associated with aging; expected aging related physiological changes and assessment findings; recognition and management of acute and chronic illnesses that commonly occur in the older adult population; promotion of health for the older adult client; and end-of-life issues and care.


NRSG140 Core Concepts of Adult Nursing

Credits: 7; 4 Lecture, 3 (135 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

This course prepares the student to care for clients experiencing common, well- defined health alterations in settings where stable clients are anticipated. Students are introduced to standardized nursing procedures and customary nursing and collaborative therapeutic modalities. The following body systems will be addressed: neurological, cardiac, respiratory, renal/urological, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, endocrine, reproductive, integumentary, sensory, and hematological. The topics of pre-operative care, pain, infection/immunity, and cancer will be addressed. Additionally, recognition and emergent treatment of rapidly changing conditions will be introduced.


NRSG142 Core Concepts of Maternal/Child Nursing

Credits: 3; 2 Lecture, 1 (45 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program
Emphasizing caring, communication, professionalism, and critical thinking, the course provides information about fetal development and prenatal and postnatal care of the mother and newborn. Role of the nurse in meeting the needs of the family is emphasized. Clinical application of care for the mother and newborn will allow the student to demonstrate acquired knowledge. The course also includes growth and development patterns as well as care of the well and sick child.


NRSG144 Core Concepts of Mental Health Nursing

Credits: 2; 2 Lecture
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

This course will explore physiological, psychological, sociocultural, spiritual, and environmental factors associated with Mental Health/Illness affecting individuals and families. Focus will be placed on basic concepts of psychiatric nursing, therapeutic modalities, as well as psychiatric disorders including psychopharmacological management.


NRSG148 Leadership Issues

Credits: 2; 1 Lecture, 1 (45 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program

This capstone course provides the Practical Nursing student information regarding the current status of vocational nursing. This course assists the nursing student in bridging the role between student and employee. Leadership/management skills, healthcare delivery systems, continuing educational needs, licensure requirements, legal issues, and standards of practice are investigated. Personal and professional identity and entry into the job market are explored. There is a forty-five hour clinical/precepted component to provide the student opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge in the long-term setting.


NRSG220 Foundations of Ethical Nursing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science Practical Nursing Program or Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program

Drawing on contemporary issues in bioethics this foundational course explores influential moral values, philosophical principles and theories as formal grounding for ethical decision making and action in health care. A broad historical, cultural and societal perspective is emphasized to provide the background for understanding the everyday ethical problems that health professionals encounter in their practices. A psychological and social framework of analysis is used to foster sensitivity, skills of analysis and ethical behavior in situations of moral conflict.


NRSG250 LPN to RN Transition

Credits: 3; 3 Lecture
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program

This course will focus on the role transition from LPN to RN in relation to the concepts and principles of holistic nursing care. Focus is on the continuing development of roles and responsibilities of the RN as defined by the scope of practice standards, nursing theory, and conceptual models.


NRSG252 Complex Care Needs of Maternal/Child Nursing

Credits: 3; 2 Lecture, 1 (45 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program

This course presents concepts and principles related to the registered nurse providing nursing care for childbearing families and children who experience complex alterations in the functional dimensions of health. Focus is on the use of the nursing process in assessment and application of advanced concepts in the care of the childbearing family, or a child with more complex health care problems from birth through adolescence. The course will explore special needs and complications during the perinatal experience, and altered functioning, special needs and disease processes manifested in children.


NRSG254 Complex Care Needs of Mental Health Nursing

Credits: 2; 1 Lecture, 1 (45 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program
This course explores physiological, psychological, sociocultural, spiritual, and environmental factors associated with Mental Health/Illness affecting individuals and families across the lifespan. Focus will be placed on basic concepts of psychiatric nursing, therapeutic modalities, as well as psychiatric disorders including psychopharmacological management. Through the implementation of the nursing process, students will formulate a plan of care for an individual who has been diagnosed and treated for a mental illness.


NRSG256 Pathophysiology

Credits: 3; 3 Lecture
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program
This course will introduce the student to the basic principles and processes of Pathophysiology including cellular communication, genes and genetic disease, forms of cellular injury, fluid and electrolyte/acid base balance, immunity, stress coping and illness, and tumor biology. Pathophysiology of the most common alterations according to body system will also be discussed as well as the latest developments in research related to each area.


NRSG262 Complex Care Needs-Adult Client

Credits: 4; 2 Lecture, 2 (90 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites:
Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program
This course prepares the student to provide nursing care to adult clients experiencing acutely changing conditions in settings where outcome is less predictable. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s response to emergent/life-threatening/rapidly changing conditions. Topics covered include collaborative therapeutic modalities related to acute/complex neurological, cardiac, respiratory, hematological, endocrinologic events, shock, sepsis/SIRS, complex burns, etc.


NRSG265 Advanced Clinical Skills

Credits: 1; 1 (30 hrs) Lab
Prerequisite: Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program

This course prepares the student to carry out complex nursing interventions across the lifespan. Topics covered include IV therapies such as central venous therapy, parenteral nutrition, IV medication administration, complex IV infusions, blood/blood product administrations, advanced airway/ventilatory support, wound care, laboratory values, complex gastrointestinal problems, arrhythmia identification, mobility issues, disaster preparedness, and palliative care.


NRSG266 Managed Client Care

Credits: 4; 2 Lecture, 2 (90 hrs.) Clinical
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Science Registered Nursing Program

This course covers topics related to integrated nursing care of individual clients and groups of clients as well as basic principles related to leadership and management in nursing. Topics include effective communication techniques in the employment setting; role differentiation among care providers; organization and prioritization; delegation, supervision, management of health care resources, legal and ethical issues, values clarification, conflict resolution, and consensus building. The course requires students to integrate knowledge and skills learned from other nursing courses and help them transition from the role of student to that of a Registered Nurse. Licensure exam (NCLEX-RN) preparation and process are also included as a component of the course. The preceptor-based clinical component allows the student to function in the role of a registered nurse while working one-on-one with a designated RN preceptor.

NRSM280 Water Rights and Water Policy

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to examine the laws and policies governing water resources along with the historical, social, environmental, and economic forces that shape them. The evolution of water laws and policy up to and through the transformative 1970s to the present will be explored by an examination of water resources and their allocation in several Montana watersheds and California’s Mono Basin. The administration of water rights and water quality laws by state and federal agencies in Montana and the West will be studied utilizing recent legal and policy debates and decisions.


NUTR221 Basic Human Nutrition

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introductory study of human nutrition. Major nutrients are covered as well as food sources, how nutrients are used by the body, age-related recommendations for food intake, eating behaviors, methods of nutritional assessment and standard measures of normal nutritional status. Major public health nutrition problems are discussed.


OT107 Introduction to Paralegal Studies

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Introduction to Paralegal Studies introduces the student to a variety of paralegal careers in private law firms, government agencies, and business. The course provides an overview of the framework of American law, the structure and functions of state and federal court systems, and the steps involved in the litigation process. Students will develop an awareness of the skills and attributes required to perform the job duties of a paralegal, as well as learn about functioning effectively in the legal environment.


OT161 Legal Terminology

Credits: 2      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to give the student a background in basic pronunciation, spelling, and definition of terms commonly used in the legal field. The course covers a variety of areas of law in addition to terms dealing with the courts, legal systems, and litigation procedures. General Latin terms in common usage are also given.


OT165 Introduction to Legal Research

Credits: 2      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: none

This course introduces the student to the art of legal research. The students will develop an understanding of the fundamental sources of the law and how to locate the law. Computerized sources of law will be introduced, including LEXIS, WESTLAW, and the Internet. Units on Montana Code Annotated and the Montana State Law Library will also be included.


OT223 Introduction To Civil Litigation and Montana Courts

Credits: 2      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course provides an overview of the structure and functions of various levels of the Montana court system and pretrial procedures used by legal support professionals. Students will learn about organizing and managing case files, the discovery process, collecting evidence, preparing exhibits for trial, as well as how to prepare pleadings and other documents according to the Montana Rules of Civil Procedure, Montana Rules of Appellate Procedure, and related statutes.


PHL110 Problems of Good and Evil

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course includes an analysis of basic moral concepts and a survey of the ways in which these concepts operate in contexts. Applications are made to contemporary moral issues one might encounter in the work world or in the student’s field of study.


PHL215 Introduction to Consciousness Studies

Credits: 3      Offered Summer Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100

Students will learn about the basic issues in consciousness studies. These issues include the “problem” of consciousness, philosophical views, neurological models, and other issues in pertinent fields.

PHSX103 Our Physical World

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095, or placement into M121 or higher

Students will build on everyday knowledge of the physical world through a combination of lecture and laboratory experiences. Topics will include mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, and electromagnetism. At the end of this course students will have an understanding of the concepts covered by the basic laws of physics, and make estimates and predictions about occurrences in certain physical situations. Throughout the course students will investigate the correspondence between physics and the other areas of sciences as well as basic mathematics.


PHSX205 College Physics I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: PHSX206
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M151, or placement into M171

This is the first semester of a two semester series of college physics. Topics covered include mechanics, wave mechanics, and thermodynamics. The lab component complements lecture material.


PHSX206 College Physics I Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: PHSX205
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M151, or placement into M171

This is the lab portion of the first semester of a two-semester series of college physics. Topics covered include mechanics, wave mechanics, and theromodynamics. The lab component complements lecture material.


PHSX207 College Physics II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: PHSX208
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PHYX205 and PHYX206

This is the second semester of a two-semester series of college physics. Topics covered include states of matter and quantum mechanics. The lab component complements lecture material.


PHSX208 College Physics II Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: PHSX207
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PHYX205 and PHYX206

This is the lab portion of the second semester of a two-semester series of college physics. Topics covered include states of matter and quantum mechanics. The lab component complements lecture material.


PSCI210 Introduction to American Government

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course explores the nature, purpose, and forms of the America government; the relationship between function and structure; the dynamics of political change; and the governmental problems of modern society. Emphasis will be placed on constitutional principles, political processes, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, elections, congress, the Presidency, and the Courts.


PSCI240 Introduction to Public Administration

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course is designed to introduce the student to management practices and networking opportunities with the public sector. Topics covered include policy-making, management issues, funding procurement, and professional ethics as they relate to local, state, and federal levels of government and not for profit agencies.


PSYX100 Introduction to Psychology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or placement score in WRIT101

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of behavior in humans and other animals, including the biological bases of behavior, learning and memory, cognition, motivation, developmental and social processes, psychological disorders, and their treatment.


PSYX120 Research Methods I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100

This course examines the experimental and quantitative methods employed in the scientific study of behavior. It is an introduction to the design and analysis of psychological research. Topics include the logic and philosophy of psychological research, conceptualizing research questions, hypothesis testing, data collection, and analysis strategies used by researchers in psychology. It is also an introduction to using statistical data analysis.


PSYX161 Fundamentals of Organizational Psychology

Credits 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the field of study that investigates the impact that individuals, groups, and structure have on behavior within organizations for the purpose of applying such knowledge toward improving an organization’s effectiveness and efficiency. The focus is on behavioral consequences of designed learning experiences, leadership, motivation, ethics, managing, job design, and perception within an organization. This is the psychology of management and human relations.


PSYX182 Stress Management

Credits 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: none

This course examines the impact of today’s stressful world on the physical and mental health of the individual. Techniques for coping with these stressors are explored and practiced in class (e.g., meditation, relaxation, breathing, etc.). Topics include personality and disease, job burnout, optimal performance, family stress, and others.


PSYX230 Developmental Psychology

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100

Developmental Psychology is a comprehensive study of development across the lifespan including physical structure, thought, and behavior of a person as a result of both biological and environmental influences. It provides an up-to-date presentation of key topics, issues, and controversies in the field of lifespan development.


PSYX233 Fundamentals of Psychology of Aging

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100
Note: This course cannot subsequently be taken as SOCI235

This course is an introduction to the relationships between neurological structures and mechanisms and their corresponding psychological cognitive processes. Origins and adaptations of structures and behaviors as well as the methods used to study these relationships are also reviewed. Clinical applications of course material are examined.


PSYX240 Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100

This course will explore psychopathology, the major psychiatric syndromes, the different theoretical perspectives, treatment, and therapy.


PSYX250 Fundamentals of Biological Psychology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100

This course is an introduction to the relationships between neurological structures and mechanisms and their corresponding psychological cognitive processes. Origins and adaptations of structures and behaviors as well as the methods used to study these relationships are also reviewed. Clinical applications of course material are examined.


PSYX260 Fundamentals of Social Psychology

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100

This course serves as an exploration of the scientific study of how people think about one another, influence one another, and relate to one another. It emphasizes the situation, the person, and personal reactions to situations, as well as the application of social psychological principles to different societies and cultures.


PSYX270 Fundamentals of Learning

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in PSYX100 or consent of instructor

This course is an introduction to scientific principles, theories, and applications of learning, including but not limited to respondent and operant conditioning, social learning, and verbal learning. The research base of learning is aslo covered.


PSYX298 Mental Health Direct Care Internship

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “B” or higher in PSYX240

This course is the Mental Health Direct Care Internship. It provides the students with two aspects of mental health direct care. First, it is an overview of the mental health system. Included in this is 1) the different professionals within mental health (psychiatrists, psychologists, case managers, psychotherapists), 2) levels of care (from outpatient to hospitalization), 3) political backdrop of mental health care, 4) governmental programs in mental health care (local, state, federal), 5) training in suicide prevention techniques, 6) training in dealing with violent mentally ill patients, and 7) advocacy programs available for mental health issues. Second, it is an internship at a mental health care facility where students will gain hands on experience providing direct mental health care.


READ070 Fundamentals of Reading

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to enable college students to develop strategies and skills to meet the demands of college reading.


SOCI101 Introduction to Sociology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

An introduction to basic sociological concepts and principles, emphasizing human social organization and how groups influence behavior.


SOCI201 Social Problems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

An introduction to sociological perspectives regarding society’s problems, this course examines the causes of major current and historical social problems, as well as the role of social research in identifying and solving problems.


SOCI215 Introduction to Sociology of the Family

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course examines contemporary issues and patterns within family life and the influence of larger social trends. The implication of these changes on the state of the family as an institution is also explored.


SOCI235 Aging and Society

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none
Note: This course cannot subsequently be taken as PSYX233

This course focuses on the demographic, social, and cultural effects of aging in society. Students will examine how the aging population will affect and be affected by such factors as government, health care, and the economy. Emphasis is placed upon aging in the United States.


SPNS101 Elementary Spanish I

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This introductory course prepares students for basic communication in Spanish and presents fundamentals of the language holistically through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course also explores cultural information.


SPNS102 Elementary Spanish II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in SPNS101

This course continues and builds upon the fundamentals of the Spanish language, and prepares students for more in-depth communication through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural information is also included.


STAT216 Introduction to Statistics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M115, M121, or M145 or higher or satisfactory score on placement test

This course teaches a basic introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, fundamentals of probability, bionomial distribution, estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for normal distributions, correlation, and simple linear regression.


TASK113 Keyboarding and Document Processing

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None

This course is for students who either have successfully completed Introduction to Keyboarding (TASK090) or have previously mastered basic keyboarding skills at the rate of 20 wpm for one minute with two errors or fewer. Preparation of memos, business letters, simple tabulations, reports, along with continued speed building, and proper keyboarding techniques, are included in this course. Students will learn the basic principles of Microsoft Word 2010 and will use the software to format documents.


TASK150 Customer Service Strategies

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Customer service is an integral part of doing business. Developing excellent customer service can help a business earn customers and accomplish its goals. In this course students will define and evaluate effective customer service while focusing on determining and meeting the needs of internal and external customers.


TASK201 Production Keyboarding

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in TASK113 or consent of instructor

Students work on development and improvement of keyboarding techniques, keyboarding skills, speed, and accuracy. Production of mailable copy for business applications useful in an office situation will be emphasized.


TASK210 Office Success Strategies

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introduction to the many aspects of a business environment. Topics covered include teamwork and office relationships, telephone and postal procedures, office equipment, use of reference materials, prioritizing and calendaring, meetings and travel arrangements, ergonomics and safety, and office etiquette.


TASK292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, Faculty Sponsor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


TASK298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of the Division Chair

Designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform work outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work.


TASK299 Integrated Office Capstone

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CAPP153, CAPP154, CAPP156, CAPP158

Integrated Office Capstone utilizes the knowledge gained in the areas of computer skills, communication and writing techniques, business knowledge, customer service skills, project management, and office procedures in the creation of a culminating project.


THTR101 Introduction to Theater

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

An exploration of the expressive powers of theater, with an emphasis on reflection, comparison, and analysis of written and performed dramatic works.


THTR120 Introduction to Acting I

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

Students will work on basic acting skills through group as well as individual acting exercises, hands-on script analysis, and scene study with fellow actors.


WLDG101 Welding Fundamentals for Auto Tech/Diesel

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This course provides students the basic welding skills needed to adequately and safely make minor repairs to automobiles and diesel powered cars and trucks using the SMAW and GMAW weld processes. Students will also be given instruction on the safe and proper use of an oxy-acetylene cutting torch and plasma cutter.


WLDG103 Welding Fundamentals for Construction Trades

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This course will instruct students on proper set up and techniques used in the cutting, fitting, and welding of steel studs used in the construction industry. Students will also receive training in the use of a cutting torch as it relates to the construction trade. Students will receive instruction on safe operation of a 4500 lb. lift truck.


WLDG105 Shop Safety

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

Safe work practices are paramount in all aspects of industrial work. Students will receive training in each piece of equipment using manufacturers’ safety recommendations. Students will learn to identify and follow safe work practices as well as inspections of power equipment (portable and stationary), hand tools, and also demonstrate the safe and proper use of each tool.


WLDG112 Cutting Processes

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WLDG105

This course will examine the different cutting processes used in today’s welding industry. The cutting processes examined in this course are Oxy Fuel, Plasma Arc, and Carbon Arc cutting. Hands on training will be administered throughout this course to ensure that proper technique and safety measures are met with all above mentioned cutting processes.


WLDG117 Blueprint Reading and Weld Symbols

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the basics for understanding the reading of blueprints and shop drawings. The use of AWS welding symbols for blueprint reading is also covered.


WLDG131 Intro to Layout and Pattern Making

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course covers fabrication and layout of different types of welding designs, including multi-core elbows, transitions, square to rounds, flanges, and other types of dust and emission control fittings. Students will be required to layout patterns on paper transfer patterns to steel plates and tubing. Use of shear, brake, and roll machines will also be required during this phase of welding.


WLDG132 Estimating of Job Materials

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WLDG105, WLDG180, or WLDG133
This course covers the estimating of material needed to complete a job. With the use of shop drawings, students create a list of the required materials. Students will use steel supply books as a reference to calculate weights and estimate prices. Labor time is then estimated to create a total bid for the project to be completed. This course also includes the use of formulas to measure volume, length, and weights.


WLDG133 GMAW, FCAW, and GMAW-P

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

The course starts with a basic understanding of how the MIG welding processes work, with the concepts of basic electricity, filler metals, and applications. A hands-on welding experience is gained in GMAW, GMAW-Dual Shield, GMAW-P. Using these welding processes in multiple steps, exercises, and welding positions, the student will gain a wide variety of welding knowledge. An American Welding Society certification in GMAW-Dual Shield core wire can be obtained at the end of the course.


WLDG140 Intro GAS Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)- Integrated Lab

Credits: 3
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in WLDG105, WLDG112, WLDG117, WLDG131, WLDG132, WLDG133, and WLDG180
In this course, students will be given instruction on using the Gas Tungsten ARC welding (GTAW) process. This course will cover instruction on safety, setup, and proper techniques in welding aluminum, mild steel, and stainless steel. Instruction will also be given on proper setup and uses of spool guns used in industry.


WLDG151 Shop Practices

Credits: 4
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in WLDG105, WLDG112, WLDG117, WLDG131, WLDG132, WLDG133, and WLDG140
This is an ongoing semester course during normally scheduled shop hours. It is intended to match spring semester students with live, practical shop experiences involving subject matter previously covered in other courses. Emphasis will be on productivity.


WLDG155 Design and Fabrication

Credits: 4
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in WLDG117, WLDG131, WLDG132, WLDG133, WLDG140, and WLDG180
This course incorporates all skills learned during the fall semester courses. Students will learn proper identification, care, and use of hand tools used in metal fabrication. Students will be assigned in-shop and live work projects to refine their fabrication and welding skills.


WLDG160 Rigging for Welders

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to provide basic knowledge of rigging procedures. This course will include instruction on how to safely use slings, hitches, rigging hardware, sling stress, hoists, and rigging operations and practices. Students will receive training on how to communicate with hand signals and have the opportunity to operate a six-ton carry deck crane.


WLDG180 Shielded Metal Arc Welding

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This course starts with a basic understanding of the stick welding process, including the concepts of basic electricity, filler metals, and applications. A hands-on welding experience is gained through multiple steps and exercises, using multiple welding filler metals and welding positions. An American Welding Society certification can be obtained at the end of the course.


WLDG213 Pipe Welding Lab I

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

This course provides the student with a thorough technical understanding of preparation and fit-up for welding pipe. Students acquire the necessary skills to perform satisfactory welds on different materials of pipe, in all positions and situations, using SMAW welding process. The student develops the skills necessary to produce quality pipe fitting and welds needed in today’s workforce.


WLDG217 Advanced Blueprint

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

This course will instruct students how to draw and read sophisticated blueprints using AutoCAD format. Instructions will also include taking general arrangement drawings and breaking down into shop drawings. Students will learn how to properly dimension, detail, and include weld symbols into shop drawings.


WLDG225 Structural Fabrication

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

This course is designed to give students the ability to lay out and fabricate various components used in the structural construction of buildings and infrastructure. Students will lay out, drill, and cut to length columns and beams according to blueprint specifications. Instruction will also be given on how to layout and fabricate base plates, gusset supports, and brackets used to support steel structure. In addition, students will fabricate a stairway and adjoining handrail using proper rise and run standards and dimensions.


WLDG230 Field Welding and Processes

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

This course is designed to introduce the students into a field welder’s environment. The students will become knowledgeable in the different weld applications presented in the field and the welding variables that can occur. In this course the students will learn to properly set up and maintain portable welding power sources, suitcase wire feeders, cutting systems, and other field equipment. Students will be taught safety in the field environment.


WLDG243 Advanced Metal Fabrication I

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

Metal Fabrication will focus on the planning and execution of projects using the knowledge and skills already acquired during the first year of the welding program. Students will apply these skills in a shop-like atmosphere working directly with customers, completing repairs, modifications and new construction. With this work the students will prepare blueprints, using hand drawing techniques along with AutoCAD to complete more complicated drawings.


WLDG244 Advanced Metal Fabrication II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

Students will learn to lay out and fabricate various ventilation components found in industrial settings. This course will give students instruction in laying out, cutting and fabricating elbows, square to round, cones, offsets, and laterals. These components will be fabricated using shears, bending breaks, forming rolls, and hydraulic punches. In addition students will weld out and assemble ventilation components according to blueprint specifications.


WLDG245 Metal Fabrication Design and Construction

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

This course is designed to challenge students on more complex fabrication and repair job assignments. Students will systematically plan out, order material, and perform repair and fabrication work orders. Students will select the proper welding procedures and processes for each job assignment. Although instructors will oversee the job, students will be challenged to take on a leadership role with less supervision. Students will experience working with others in a team-like atmosphere while accomplishing specific goals.


WLDG255 CNC Burn Table Programming and Operation

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

Introduction to computer numerically controlled machines with an emphasis on programming, setup, and use in plasma-cutting burn tables. Students will use the Shop Data Systems HVAC program to create duct work transitions to be cut on the CNC burn table. AutoCad is used to create specialty parts for burn table cutting. As a final step, all parts are programmed through the use of OneCNC programming by the students to prepare the G-codes used by the CNC burn table.


WLDG265 MSHA Safety Training

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: Completion of Certificate of Applied Science in Welding

A major part of the welding industry involves working in the mining industry. This course will cover required safety rules governing work performed in the mining industry. Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students will be certified to work at mine and quarry sites. In addition, students will receive certification in C.P.R.


WRIT080 Building Basic Writing Skills

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

A review of fundamental writing skills, this course focuses on sentences and paragraphs. Students will develop short compositions that demonstrate control of the conventions of standard written English, sentence structure, and sequence of ideas. Course is offered Pass/No pass.


WRIT095 Developmental Writing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course reviews the basics of good writing and places emphasis on mastering the component parts of an essay, as well as the conventions of English grammar, usage, and mechanics.


WRIT096 College Writing Lab

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: Score of 6 or higher on E-Write test, ACT, or SAT

This course reviews the basics of good writing. It emphasizes mastering the components of an essay, as well as the conventions of English grammar, usage, and mechanics. WRIT096 may be selected as a co-requisite to WRIT101, in lieu of WRIT095, by students who score a 6 or higher on the E-Write, ACT, or SAT writing tests.


WRIT101 College Writing I

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory placement score

This course provides experience in written expression of ideas in expository prose with emphasis on the development of ideas, awareness of audience, structure, and clarity.


WRIT104T Workplace Communication

Credits: 2      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

An introduction to the basic demands of written communication in the workplace. Emphasis on the elements of and strategies for effective communication in typical written formats, with particular attention paid to job applications, job inquiry letters, resumes, and interviews.


WRIT121T Introduction to Technical Writing

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or satisfactory placement score

Experience in communication formats typical of technical careers. Emphasis on writing as the craft of the critical thinker, involving analysis of audience, context, and purpose, as well as the ability to locate, synthesize, analyze, organize, and present information effectively.


WRIT201 College Writing II

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT101

Continued experience in written expression of ideas in expository prose with an emphasis on critical response, argumentation, and research. Areas of study include research methods, evaluating source materials, and formal documentation, critical review and evaluation, and presenting logical, coherent, and forceful arguments.


WRIT210 Scientfic Report Writing

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 or WRIT121T

This course provides students with the tools to write effective research documents and other documents in the scientific and industrial fields. Topics include the challenges of scientific writing and other workplace writing, summary writing, identifying and correcting common writing problems, completing governmental agency forms, and revising documents for maximum effectiveness. This course will also examine how audience influences a document’s style, format, and content.

 
 

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